sensuality

A Quote by William Gass on knowing, knowledge, sensuality, self, and spirituality

Knowing has two poles, and they are always poles apart: carnal knowing, the laying on of hands, the hanging of the fact by head or heels, the measurement of mass and motion, the calibration of brutal blows, the counting of supplies; and spiritual knowing, invisibly felt by the inside self, who is but a fought-over field of distraction, a stage where we recite the monotonous monologue that is our life, a knowing governed by internal tides, by intimations, motives, resolutions, by temptations, secrecy, shame, and pride.

William Gass

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by David Abram on reality, nature, earth, land, ecology, sensuality, and senses

The practice of realignment with reality can hardly afford to be utopian. It cannot base itself upon a vision hatched in our heads and then projected into the future. Any approach to current problems that aims us toward a mentally envisioned future implicitly holds us within the oblivion of linear time. It holds us, that is, within the same illusory dimension that enabled us to neglect and finally to forget the land around us. By projecting the solution somewhere outside of the perceivable present, it invites our attention away from the sensuous surroundings, induces us to dull our senses, yet again, on behalf of a mental ideal.

A genuinely ecological approach does not work to attain a mentally envisioned future, but strives to enter, ever more deeply, into the sensorial present. It strives to become ever more awake to the other lives, the other forms of sentience and sensibility that surround us in the open field of the present moment. For the other animals and the gathering clouds do not exist in linear time. We meet them only when the thrust of historical time begins to open itself outward, when we walk out of our heads into the cycling life of the land around us. This wild expanse has its own timing, its rhythms of dawning and dusk, its seasons of gestation and bud and blossom. It is here, and not in linear history, that the ravens reside.

David Abram

Source: The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World (Vintage), Pages: 272-273

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by David Abram on bodies, earth, language, environment, rhythms, stillness, creativity, sensuality, and senses

Humans, like other animals, are shaped by the places they inhabit, both individually and collectively. Our bodily rhythms, our moods, cycles of creativity and stillness, even our thoughts are readily engaged and influenced by seasonal patterns in the land. Yet our organic attunement to the local earth is thwarted by our ever-increasing intercourse with our own signs. Transfixed by our technologies, we short-circuit the sensorial reciprocity between our breathing bodies and the bodily terrain. Human awareness folds in upon itself, and the senses – once the crucial site of our engagement with the wild and animate earth – become mere adjuncts of an isolate and abstract mind bent on overcoming an organic reality that now seems disturbingly aloof and arbitrary.

David Abram

Source: The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World (Vintage), Pages: 267

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on birds, country, death, generations, men, music, sensuality, and songs

That is no country for old men. The young In one another's arms, birds in the trees - Those dying generations-at their song, The salmon-falls, the mackerel-crowded seas, Fish, flesh, or fowl, commend all summer long Whatever is begotten, born, and dies. Caught in that sensual music all neglect Monuments of unaging intellect.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: The Tower, 1928. Sailing to Byzantium

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Umberto Eco on extremism, justice, laughter, energy, pain, pleasure, and sensuality

When all the archetypes burst out shamelessly, we plumb the depths of Homeric profundity. Two clichés make us laugh but a hundred clichés moves us because we sense dimly that the clichés are talking among themselves, celebrating a reunion. . . . Just as the extreme of pain meets sensual pleasure, and the extreme of perversion borders on mystical energy, so too the extreme of banality allows us to catch a glimpse of the Sublime.

Umberto Eco (1932 -)

Source: "Casablanca: Cult Movies and Intertextual Collage" (1984) from Travels in Hyperreality

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on change, god, individuality, life, sensuality, spirit, spirituality, and superiority

Spiritual superiority only sees the individual. But alas, ordinarily we human beings are sensual and, therefore, as soon as it is a gathering, the impression changes-we see something abstract, the crowd, and we become different. But in the eyes of God, the infinite spirit, all the millions that have lived and now live do not make a crowd, He only sees each individual.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: THE JOURNALS

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on age, life, sensuality, world, and worth

Sound, sound the clarion, fill the fife! To all the sensual world proclaim, One crowded hour of glorious life Is worth an age without a name.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Old Mortality. Chap. xxxiv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on ambition, art, character, genius, mistakes, poetry, pride, sensuality, talent, and truth

The peril of every fine faculty is the delight of playing with it for pride. Talent is commonly developed at the expense of character, and the greater it grows, the more is the mischief. Talent is mistaken for genius, a dogma or system for truth, ambition for greatest, ingenuity for poetry, sensuality for art.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Percy Bysshe Shelley on chastity, happiness, misery, sensuality, and superstition

Chastity is a monkish and evangelical superstition, a greater foe to natural temperance even than unintellectual sensuality; it strikes at the root of all domestic happiness, and consigns more than half of the human race to misery.

Percy Shelley (1792 - 1822)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Neal A. Maxwell on awareness, blessings, existence, gifts, god, grace, journeys, laws, life, men, order, perspective, problems, sensuality, speech, spirituality, and vision

We are all aware of man's poor peripheral vision in that his views are often narrow and heedless of what is going on on each side of him. Man's problem is often one of length of view, too. This poorness of perspective often produces wonderful and pathetic paradoxes: men who have been given the blessings of life by the grace of God, cry that life is senseless; men who have been given breath and voice by God, use the powers of speech to deny God's existence; men who have been given the capacity to feel, exult so much in this gift that sensual things sublimate spiritual things; and some men who see our reaching out to distant places in our solar system conclude that this special planet is a random, unplanned mutant and refuse to connect the order of physical laws (that makes such journeys into space possible) with an Orderer.

Neal Maxwell (1926 -)

Source: For The Power Is In Them, pg. 28-29, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

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