self

A Quote by Buckminster Fuller on problems, self, humanity, and purpose

What is common to all human beings in all history is problems, problems, problems. We are here for problem-solving and, if you are any good at problem-solving, you don't come to utopia, you come to more difficult problems to solve. That apparently is what we're here for, so I therefore conclude that we humans are here for local information-gathering and local problem-solving with our minds having access to the design principles of the Universe. We are here for local information gathering and local-Universe problem-solving in support of the integrity of eternally regenerative Universe. That is a very extraordinary and important kind of a function we have.

Buckminster Fuller

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Henry Miller on memory, past, self, and reality

Your whole past is like a long sleep which would have been forgotten had there been no memory, but remembrance is there in the blood and the blood is like an ocean in which everything is washed away but that which is new and more substantial even than life - reality.

Henry Miller (1891 - 1980)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Deepak Chopra on self, reality, consciousness, thoughts, law of attraction, and intelligence

We are not onlookers peering into the unified field of separate, objective reality - we are the unified field. We can reach beyond the physical body and extend the influence of intelligence. Every thought you are thinking creates a wave in the unified field. It ripples through all the layers of intellect, mind, senses, and matter, spreading out in wider and wider circles. You are like a light radiating not photons but consciousness. As they radiate, your thoughts have an effect on everything. Your relationship to life is the same as that of one cell to your whole body. One cell can talk to your whole body. One cell can influence your whole body. You can talk to the whole of life - influence the whole of life. The whole of life is as alive as we are. The distinction between 'in here' and 'out there' is a false one - as if the heart disregarded the skin because it was not on the inside.

Deepak Chopra

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Erwin Schroedinger on reality, cosmos, universe, self, spirituality, enlightnment, experience, and life

Inconceivable as it seems to ordinary reason - you and all other conscious beings as such - are all in all. Hence this life of yours which you are living is not merely a piece of the entire existence, but is in a certain sense the whole.

Thus you can throw yourself flat on the ground, stretched out upon mother earth, with the certain conviction that you are one with her and she with you.

Erwin Schroedinger

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Pema Chodron on ego, self, awakening, and enlightenment

You're the only one who knows when you're using things to protect yourself and keep your ego together and when you're opening and letting things fall apart, letting the world come as it is - working with it rather than struggling against it. You're the only one who knows.

Pema Chodron

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Thomas Merton on self-knowledge, awareness, self, awakening, and enlightenment

Before we can become who we really are, we must become conscious of the fact that the person who we think we are, here and now, is at best an impostor and a stranger.

Thomas Merton (1915 - 1968)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Jim Britt on awareness, awakening, self, ego, and enlightnement

Waking up to who you are requires letting go of who you imagine yourself to be.

Jim Britt

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Jayne Anne Phillips on writing, awareness, meaning, meaningful, self, and life

Human beings can't live without the illusion of meaning, the apprehension of confluence, the endless debate concerning the fault in the stars or in ourselves. The writer is just the messenger, the moving target. Inside culture, the writer is the talking self. Through history, the writing that lasts is the whisper of conscience. The guild of writers is essentially a medieval guild existing in a continual Dark Age, shaman, monks, witches, nuns, working in isolation, playing with fire.

When the first illuminated manuscripts were created, few people could read. Now that people are bombarded with image and information and the World Wide Web is an open vein, few people can read. Reading with sustained attention, reading for understanding, reading to cut through random meaninglessness - such reading becomes a subversive act. The writer's first affinity is not to a loyalty, a tradition, a morality, a religion, but to life itself, and to its representation in language. Ego enters in, but writing is far too hard and solitary to be sustained by ego. The writer is compelled to write. The writer writes for love. The writer lives in spiritual debt to language, the gold key in the palm of meaning. Awake, asleep, in every moment of being, the writer stands at the gate.

The gate may open.
The gate may not.
Regardless, the writer can see straight through it.

Jayne Phillips

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Bruce Whiteman on privacy, love, self, and future

There is a catalogue of private acts which you harbour inviolable and do not speak about. Hold it whole in your head and consider what everyone you know is doing right now. Small isolated things which your imagining rescues from the silence of privacy. A social encyclopedia of the present tense. Somewhere the personality slips its leash and disappears over the back fence leaving nothing ferocious to fight off the throng of details that rushes into your brain. You become a society, a public resource, a random dictionary of ephemera. And love is the force which allows you to speak in the midst of all this negative capability and which keeps you away from madness and inside a body with a future.

Bruce Whiteman

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on life, living, loneliness, reality, and self

And this is the simple truth - that to live is to feel oneself lost. He who accepts it has already begun to find himself, to be on firm ground. Instinctively, as do the shipwrecked, he will look around for something to which to cling, and that tragic, ruthless glance, absolutely sincere, because it is a question of his salvation, will cause him to bring order into the chaos of his life. These are the only genuine ideas; the ideas of the shipwrecked. All the rest is rhetoric, posturing, farce.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Siona

Syndicate content