self-mastery

A Quote by Gerald Epstein on spirit, recieving, life, goals, outcome, practice, and self-mastery

When we give up our goals and concentrate diligently on the practices of our lives, we increase self-mastery and move toward the invisible universe, toward Spirit, to receive the wonders and miracles the universe has to offer us.

Gerald Epstein

Source: Kabbalah for Inner Peace, Pages: 15

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Emile Coue on mind, power, happiness, self-mastery, and ill

We possess within us a force of incalculable power, which, if ...we direct it in a conscious and wise manner, gives us the mastery of ourselves and allows us not only to escape... from physical and mental ills, but also to live in relative happiness.

Emile Coue

Source: Self mastery through conscious autosuggestion‎ - Page 35 by Émile Coué

Contributed by: aalfs

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, self-mastery, growth, will, spirit, transcendence, passions, morality, aristoi, valuing, power, and self-delusion

The aristic thrust and conception of "contra natura" lie in our power finitely to extend our self-mastery, to GROW in will and spirit; but as Nietzsche repeatedly teaches in ZARATHUSTRA, such ends must be WILLABLE, achievable. There is nothing to be learned from the human-all-too-human impulse for self-deification or wholesale transcendence over the vicissitudes of life -- even though this aims at something contra natura, it is not truly concretely WILLABLE, it is just a fantasy of our imagination. We cannot BECOME a God. But we can learn to hold our deepest passions in check for the sake of a higher morality, if indeed we are aristoi. Willing and valuing must become an art, must be made consonant or coherent with the fabric of our natures. Mere megalomaniacal extravagance does not truly increase our charge of concentrated power; on the contrary it fires up our ambition with inflationary abstractions that give no traction or purchase to our actual wills. That way lies radical frustration and a metaphysics of depression: an inevitable life-pattern of self-delusion, as we suffer over and over from the necessity that "it would not be better if men got what they wanted," and yet will not permit ourselves ever to see or to learn anything from this self-deception and self-betrayal.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, power, aristoi, society, enslavement, self-mastery, values, difficulty, and modernity

Just consider for a minute: look at the Many, the majoritarian cattle in every form of society who are governed by their own irrationalist beliefs and psychological needs and forces of social coordination with others (doxai). Taking control of the Many's always turbulent irrationalisms is child's play. They are the strata, the type most susceptible to enslavement not for accidental but for essential reasons. There is nothing whatsoever difficult in mastering or controlling them, and therefore it cannot be respected as any sort of value, especially not an aristic value. Values as ZARATHUSTRA argues are every people's ultimate concept of what is most difficult of all for them. What Nietzsche esteems, what in modern circumstances has come to seem "superhuman," is the aristic drive to accomplish what one judiciously recognizes as most difficult for oneself. "Power" is the natural reward or concomitant of those who struggle aristically to achieve the most contra-natural thing of all for human beings, self-mastery, the harnessing and knowing of the obscure forces that no one is in control of by birthright. There is no honor or valor in triumphing over defenseless and witless mentalities, regardless of the mass-numbers involved or the prodigious "power" (in the modern -- banausic -- sense) that results.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, self-mastery, buddha, spirit, nietzsche, greeks, power, evolution, development, and culturation

The essence of human spirit would seem to be something static to Buddha: if it has an internal imperative to become something else (something higher or more spiritual), what self-disequilibrium could it suffer from that could nonetheless still be considered spiritual in Buddha's eyes? Nietzsche sought to explain this imperative for self-acculturation, for achieving rational self-mastery, for spiritualization, for self-radicalization and self-sublimation, by means of a "Will to Power" far more comprehensive than moderns (with only the cheapest and most facile grasp of "power") can understand. As a philhellene Nietzsche perceives and respects what the Greeks took for granted, that "power" above all else must be self-reflexive, an expression of aristic self-moderation (their anti-hybristic ethos and its correlative contempt for idiotia): "power" to the Greeks is moral and philosophical and cultural and political authority because it expresses itself in the hardest thing of all for humans to achieve, self-mastery.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, resistance, knowing, truth, human nature, misanthropy, distrust, denial, self-discipline, and self-mastery

The truth about human beings is, above all other forms of truth, something far too susceptible to our own willful and subjectivist distortions; by nature we never JUST LET SUCH A THING BE, or accept it as it is. Of all the decisive and strategic things that an intelligent human being needs to know about human beings, primary on the list would be this: human beings are overwhelmingly profoundly RESISTANT to knowing the truth about human nature. The one creature in all of organic nature that is capable of KNOWING its own nature is also, paradigmatic over all other creatures, the one most IN DENIAL about that nature. To ask of mortals that they should "know themselves" is little more than a cruel joke, japing at their crippled mentality and personality. Their grasp of this structural perversity or contrariety within human nature is the basis of all Greek wisdom, their aristic "misanthropy" or principled and profound distrust of human beings as pseudophiliacs. All that human beings are willing to call "truth" (for the most part) is some saccharine or cosmetic sweetness and light, some soporific opiate against all in human existence that might demand the utmost self-discipline, rationality, self-mastery, or spirituality from them.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, progress, self-mastery, and thinking

The only measures that count are progress over your own self, and triumph over the vacant abstractions that most people mistake for thinking.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, thinking, and self-mastery

A vital part of philosophizing is learning to trust one's own intuitivist intelligence, getting one's center of gravity back between one's feet.  In our culture--so outer-directed, "objective" or extraverted--this is already heresy.  This is self-mastering thinking, centered in what has been well-tested as certainties:  autarkia or self-rule.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, love, emotions, stability, and self-mastery

Love is not a mystical or idealized relation, it is an utterly "natural" expression of self-harmonic and self-mastering individuals, but for just that reason it is something tragically, utterly, beyond being "naturally possible" for the vast majority of humans whose characters are bereft of such values and imperatives and self-subtilizing culture.  In most cases, as Nietzsche observed, all that happens between humans is that two animals find one another, and that can never be a stabilizable relation because feelings and desires (appetites) are of all experiences the most mercurial and fluctuating.  Nothing like a human life can be erected on such a foundation of constantly eroding sand; emotions, needs, feelings, will be there in every kind or form of life, but they will not have at all the same kinds of authority, power, significance, or structured role to play.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, questions, and self-mastery

Questions, as I long ago tried to teach my students, are like cellular acids that dissolve the glue holding our preconceptions, prejudices, presuppositions, etc. together in customary clumps. All the more is this dissolution a liability in societies that lack any aristic higher structure, any form of critical authority or penetrating logic that is proof against merely slavish or conventionalist taking-for-granted and also against sophist-cynical-nihilist disillusionment. One cannot see and cannot say what is what without then initiating in that bourgeois consensus a cascade of disillusionment, a process of abolishing one absurdity after another. Just the ability to see the meanings of one's own language, what it actually implies and signifies, is already the first step in a process of ultimate subversion. The scales are falling from one's eyes, one doesn't need someone else to lead one around by the hand anymore like a child. --The end of tutelage, the beginning of appropriating one's mind for one's own disciplined use: for a certain, horrified-by-everything kind of slavish personality, this independence or self-responsibility is the most horrific prospect of all.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

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