seasons

A Quote by William Shakespeare on age, beauty, death, deception, fear, friendship, perception, pride, and seasons

To me, fair friend, you never can be old, For as you were when first your eye I eyed, Such seems your beauty still. Three winters cold Have from the forests shook three summers' pride, Three beauteous springs to yellow autumn turn'd In process of the seasons have I seen, Three April perfumes in three hot Junes burn'd, Since first I saw you fresh, which yet are green. Ah! yet doth beauty, like a dial-hand, Steal from his figure and no pace perceived; So your sweet hue, which methinks still doth stand, Hath motion and mine eye may be deceived: For fear of which, hear this, thou age unbred; Ere you were born was beauty's summer dead.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Sonnet 104

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on seasons and sorrow

Sorrow breaks seasons and reposing hours, Makes the night morning, and the noontide night.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard III, Act 1, Scene 4

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on deed, fear, force, god, heart, heaven, judaism, justice, mercy, power, prayer, quality, salvation, and seasons

The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath: it is twice bless'd; It blesseth him that gives and him that takes: 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; But mercy is above the sceptred sway, It is enthroned in the heart of kings, It is an attribute to God himself, And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice. Therefore Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That in the course of justice none of us Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy, And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Merchant of Venice, Act iv. Sc. 1,

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on adoption, blessings, borrowing, character, day, entertainment, familiarity, farewells, friendship, generosity, habits, judgment, memory, seasons, soul, thought, and vulgarity

And these few precepts in thy memory Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, Nor any unproportion'd thought his act. Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar; The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel; But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatch'd, unfledg'd comrade. Beware Of entrance to a quarrel; but, being in, Bear't that th' opposed may beware of thee. Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; For the apparel oft proclaims the man, And they in France of the best rank and station Are most select and generous, chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry, This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man. Farewell; my blessing season this in thee!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare Library), Pages: Act I Scene iii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Pitt, "the Elder Pitt on confidence, credulity, growth, plants, seasons, and youth

Confidence is a plant of slow growth in an aged bosom, youth is the season of credulity.

William Pitt (1708 - 1778)

Source: Speech, House of Commons, Jan. 14, 1766.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Willa Sibert Cather on country and seasons

There is something frank and joyous and young in the open face of the country. It gives itself ungrudgingly to the moods of the season, holding nothing back.

Willa Cather (1873 - 1947)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wheeler McMillen on animals, belief, blessings, children, cities, citizenship, communism, dance, earth, freedom, god, good, honor, labor, laws, liberty, magic, managers, men, men and women, miracles, nature, neighbors, peace, people, rules, sc

We are American farmers. We are Americans. We are farmers. Our grandsires freed this virgin continent,plowed it from East to West, and gave it to us.This land is for us and for our children tomake richer and more fruitful. We grow foods, fibers - fifteen times asmuch as we use. We grow men and women -- farmers, Presidents, and Senators, generals of industry,captains of commerce, missionaries, builders. Communists would call us capitalists, because we own land and we own tools. Capitalists might choose to call us laborers,because we work with our hands. Others may call us managers, because wedirect men and manage materials. Our children call us "Dad." We are also deacons, stockholders, mechanics, veterinarians, electricians, schoolboard members, Rotarians, voters, scientists,neighbors, men of good will. Our rules are Nature's rules, the laws of God. We command the magic of the seasons andthe miracles of science, because we obey Nature's rules. Our raw materials are soil and seed, animals, the atmosphere and the rain, and the mighty sun. We work with brains. We toil with musclesof steel, fed by the fires of lightning and byoils from the inner earth. We are partners with the laboratory, withthe factory, and with all the people. We provide industry with ever-renewableraw materials from the inexhaustible world ofplants. We buy products from the labor ofevery fellow-citizen.Our efficiencies have raised great cities andhappy towns, and have given all the peoplemeat and bread. We believe in work and in honor We believe in freedom. We are grateful for the American freedomthat has let us earn so many blessings. We know that liberty is our most preciouspossession. At the ballot-boxes and on thebattlefield we shall defend it. We have proven a new pattern of abun-dance. We pray that we may also help tomake a pattern for peace.

Wheeler McMillen

Source: American Farmers

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on seasons

in

Autumn is a season followed immediately by looking forward to Spring.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on character, garden, reflection, and seasons

A person's character and their garden both reflect the amount of weeding that was done during the growing season.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on literature, names, seasons, time, and words

"In Western languages the names of the four seasons became complete only a few centuries ago. Words for winter and summer appear quite early but in English "spring" came to be used as the name of the season as late as the sixteenth century, and in German 'fruhjahr', "spring" appeared about the same time. Similarly, in India "hemanta(winter) and vasanta(spring)" appear in Sanskrit literature very early, while other seasonal terms come much later."

unknown

Source: The Importance of Season Words

Contributed by: Zaady

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