scientists

A Quote by Martin Gardner on biography, history, men, politics, schools, and scientists

Biographical history, as taught in our public schools, is still largely a history of boneheads: ridiculous kings and queens, paranoid political leaders, compulsive voyagers, ignorant generals -- the flotsam and jetsam of historical currents. The men who radically altered history, the great scientists and mathematicians, are seldom mentioned, if at all.

Martin Gardner

Source: G. Simmons Calculus Gems, New York: McGraw Hill, 1992.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marjorie Harris on art, colors, garden, and scientists

The longer you garden the better the eye gets, the more tuned to how colors vibrate in different ways and what they can do to each other. You become a scientist as well as an artist, with the lines between increasingly blurred.

Marjorie Harris

Source: the Garden, 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Madame Marie Curie on errors, scientists, and truth

There are sadistic scientists who hurry to hunt down error instead of establishing the truth.

Marie Curie (1867 - 1934)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Luther Burbank on love, scientists, and truth

The scientist is a lover of truth for the very love of truth itself, wherever it may lead.

Luther Burbank (1849 - 1926)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Loren Eiseley on art, creativity, darkness, loneliness, scientists, and universe

Some degree of withdrawal serves to nurture man's creative powers. The artist and the scientist bring out of the dark void, like the mysterious universe itself, the unique, the strange, the unexpected. Numerous observers have testified upon the loneliness of the process.

Loren Eiseley (1907 - 1977)

Source: The Mind as Nature

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Loren Eiseley on acceptance, art, generations, genius, humanity, popularity, scientists, and tragedy

It is frequently the tragedy of the great artist, as it is of the great scientist, that he frightens the ordinary man. If he is more than a popular story-teller it may take humanity a generation to absorb and grow accustomed to the new geography with which the scientist or artist presents us. Even then, perhaps only the more imaginative and literate may accept him. Subconsciously the genius is feared as an image breaker; frequently he does not accept the opinions of the mass, or man's opinion of himself.

Loren Eiseley (1907 - 1977)

Source: The Mind as Nature

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jules Henri Poincaré on beauty, intelligence, life, nature, order, purity, science, scientists, senses, study, and worth

The scientist does not study nature because it is useful; he studies it because he delights in it, and he delights in it because it is beautiful. If nature were not beautiful, it would not be worth knowing, and if nature were not worth knowing, life would not be worth living. Of course I do not here speak of that beauty that strikes the senses, the beauty of qualities and appearances; not that I undervalue such beauty, far from it, but it has nothing to do with science; I mean that profounder beauty which comes from the harmonious order of the parts, and which a pure intelligence can grasp.

Jules Henri Poincare (1854 - 1912)

Source: quoted by Gary William Flake in The Computational Beauty of Nature, 1998

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jules Henri Poincaré on art, nature, pleasure, scientists, and work

A scientist worthy of his name, about all a mathematician, experiences in his work is the same impression as an artist; his pleasure is as great and of the same nature.

Jules Henri Poincare (1854 - 1912)

Source: N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC: Rome Press Inc., 1988.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John R. Whiting on art, climate, home, philosophy, and scientists

The home gardener is part scientist, part artist, part philosopher, part plowman. He modifies the climate around his home.

John R. Whiting

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John R. Silber on existence, life, science, and scientists

One can forget the meaninglessness of his own existence by occupying himself with scientific experiments of dubious import. Countless scientists and scholars spend their lives in the search of truths that are irrelevant to them.

John R. Silber

Contributed by: Zaady

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