science

A Quote by David Eugene Smith on god, mathematics, merit, poetry, religion, science, spirit, thought, truth, words, and world

One merit of mathematics few will deny: it says more in fewer words than any other science. The formula, e^iπ = -1 expressed a world of thought, of truth, of poetry, and of the religious spirit "God eternally geometrizes."

David Eugene Smith

Source: N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC:Rome Press Inc., 1988.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by David Eli Lilienthal on citizenship, country, discovery, force, questions, and science

It is chiefly upon the lay citizen, informed about science but not its practitioner, that the country must depend in determining the use to which science is put, in resolving the many public policy questions that scientific discoveries constantly force upon us.

David Eli Lilienthal (1899 -)

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A Quote by Daisy Bates on science

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Opinions differ most when there is least scientific warrant for having any.

Daisy Bates (1863 - 1951)

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A Quote by Cyril Connolly on art, imagination, myth, and science

Today the function of the artist is to bring imagination to science and science to imagination, where they meet, in the myth.

Cyril Connolly (1903 - 1974)

Source: The Unquiet Grave, 1944.

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A Quote by Clarence Francis on happiness, history, promises, and science

What an exciting super-tomorrow it will be! Americans are today making the greatest scientific developments in our history. That is a promise of new levels of employment, industrial activity and human happiness.

Clarence Francis

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A Quote by Christian Gauss on civilization, facts, force, god, good, humanity, religion, science, and suffering

Any God who is to be of any use to civilization, to suffering humanity, or to religion must have in some way or other some at least of the attributes not of a substance or of a force but of a person. He must be interested as science is not in good and beautiful and holy. . . . Let us face the facts and admit as some do not that there are some services to civilization which science cannot render.

Christian Gauss

Source: The Threat of Science included in The College Book of Essays

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A Quote by Charles Sanders Peirce on danger, dreams, ethics, logic, mathematics, needs, purity, and science

...mathematics is distinguished from all other sciences except only ethics, in standing in no need of ethics. Every other science, even logic, especially in its early stages, is in danger of evaporating into airy nothingness, degenerating, as the Germans say, into an arachnoid film, spun from the stuff that dreams are made of. There is no such danger for pure mathematics; for that is precisely what mathematics ought to be.

Charles Sanders Peirce (1839 - 1914)

Source: "The Essence of Mathematics" in J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.

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A Quote by Charles Sanders Peirce on science

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The one [the logician] studies the science of drawing conclusions, the other [the mathematician] the science which draws necessary conclusions.

Charles Sanders Peirce (1839 - 1914)

Source: "The Essence of Mathematics" in J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.

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A Quote by Charles Proteus Steinmetz on mathematics, men, proof, relatives, and science

Mathematics is the most exact science, and its conclusions are capable of absolute proof. But this is so only because mathematics does not attempt to draw absolute conclusions. All mathematical truths are relative, conditional. In E. T. Bell Men of Mathematics, New York: Simona and Schuster, 1937.

Charles Proteus Steinmetz (1865 - 1923)

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A Quote by Charles Macklin on history, justice, laws, people, science, uncertainty, and words

The law is a sort of hocus-pocus science, that smiles in yer face while it picks yer pocket; and the glorious uncertainty of it is of mair use to the professors than the justice of it. Hocus was an old cunning attorney. - Dr. John Arbuthnot, History of John Bull, 1712. The words of consecration, "Hoc est corpus," were travestied into a nickname for jugglery, as "Hocus-pocus." - John Richard Green, A Short History of the English People, 1874.

Charles Macklin (1697 - 1797)

Source: Love à la Mode. Act ii. Sc. 1.

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