saints

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on church, genius, and saints

Universities are, of course, hostile to geniuses, which, seeing and using ways of their own, discredit the routine: as churches and monasteries persecute youthful saints.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on divinity, men, philosophy, poets, profit, sacred, and saints

To the poet, to the philosopher, to the saint, all things are friendly and sacred, all events profitable, all days holy, all men divine.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Phyllis McGinley on borrowing, brides, children, christianity, fame, family, fatherhood, faults, generosity, gold, hunger, love, luck, motherhood, patience, poetry, problems, relatives, saints, sharing, sister, soul, thinking, and wine

The subject of the poem was Bridget of Kildare (450-523), a Christian lass among the Druids in Ireland. Saint Bridget was A problem child. Although a lass Demure and mild, And one who strove To please her dad, Saint Bridget drove The family mad. For here's the fault in Bridget lay: She WOULD give everything away. To any soul Whose luck was out She'd give her bowl Of stirabout; She'd give her shawl, Divide her purse With one or all. And what was worse, When she ran out of things to give She'd borrow from a relative. Her father's gold, Her grandsire's dinner, She'd hand to cold and hungry sinner; Give wine, give meat, No matter whose; Take from her feet The very shoes, And when her shoes had gone to others, Fetch forth her sister's and her mother's. She could not quit. She had to share; Gave bit by bit The silverware, The barnyard geese, The parlor rug, Her little niece-'s christening mug, Even her bed to those in want, And then the mattress of her aunt. An easy touch For poor and lowly, She gave so much And grew so holy That when she died Of years and fame, The countryside Put on her name, And still the Isles of Erin fidget With generous girls named Bride or Bridget. Well, one must love her. Nonetheless, In thinking of her Givingness, There's no denial She must have been A sort of trial Unto her kin. The moral, too, seems rather quaint. WHO had the patience of a saint, From evidence presented here? Saint Bridget? Or her near and dear?

Phyllis McGinley (1905 - 1978)

Source: "The Giveaway," from The Love Letters ofd Phyllis McGinley, New York, Viking Press, 1957

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A Quote by Matthew Arnold on power, saints, and soul

The will is free; Strong is the soul, and wise, and beautiful; The seeds of godlike power are in us still; Gods are we, bards, saints, heroes, if we will!

Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Source: Written in a copy of Emerson’s Essays

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A Quote by Martin Luther King, Jr. on eternity, god, harmony, injustice, justice, laws, and saints

A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of Saint Thomas Aquinas, an unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal and natural law.

Martin Luther King Jr (1929 - 1968)

Source: Letter from Birmingham Jail (April 1963)

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A Quote by Lecomte Du Nouy on curiosity, deed, influence, intelligence, prophets, sacrifice, and saints

Man is not merely a combination of appetites, instincts, passions and curiosity. Something more is needed to explain great human deeds, virtues, sacrifices, martyrdom. There is an element in the great mystics, the saints, the prophets, whose influence has been felt for centuries, which escapes mere intelligence.

Lecomte Du Nouy

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A Quote by Joseph F. Smith on beginning, body, books, day, death, influence, and saints

A story is told of an English officer in old India, who one day went to the book shelf to take down a book. As he reached his hand up over the volume his finger was bitten by an adder. After a few hours the finger began to swell. Later on the swelling went into his arm, and finally the whole body was affected, and in a few days the officer was dead. There are adders concealed in many a book. Let the Saints beware of the books that enter their homes, for their influence may be as poisonous and deadly as the adder which brought death to the English officer in old India.

Joseph F. Smith (1838 - 1918)

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A Quote by John Taylor on corruption, mind, people, saints, and suffering

I used to think, if I were the Lord, I would not suffer people to be tried as they are. But I have changed my mind on that subject. Now I think I would, if I were the Lord, because it purges out the meanness and corruption that stick around the saints, like flies around molasses.

John Taylor (1808 - 1887)

Source: Journal of Discourses, 5:115.

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A Quote by John Milton on children, clarity, day, death, force, goodness, husbands, laws, love, mind, purity, saints, sons, and trust

Methought I saw my late espoused saint Brought to me, like Alcestis, from the grave, Whom Jove's great son to her glad husband gave, Rescued from death by force, though pale and faint. Mine, as whom washed from spot of child-bed taint Purification in the Old Law did save, And such, as yet once more I trust to have Full sight of her in Heav'n without restraint, Came vested all in white, pure as her mind: Her face was veiled, yet to my fancied sight Love, sweetness, goodness, in her person shined So clear, as in no face with more delight. But O, as to embrace me she inclined, I waked, she fled, and day brought back my night.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XXIII, On His Deceased Wife

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A Quote by John Milton on books, fatherhood, learning, lies, motherhood, mountains, purity, saints, truth, and tyranny

Avenge, O Lord, Thy slaughtered saints, whose bones Lie scattered on the Alpine mountains cold; Ev'n them who kept Thy truth so pure of old, When all our fathers worshipped stocks and stones, Forget not: In Thy book record their groans Who were Thy sheep, and in their ancient fold Slain by the bloody Piemontese that rolled Mother with infant down the rocks. Their moans The vales redoubled to the hills, and they To Heav'n. Their martyred blood and ashes sow O'er all th' Italian fields, where still doth sway The triple tyrant; that from these may grow A hundred-fold, who having learned Thy way Early may fly the Babylonian woe.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Sonnet XVIII, On the late Massacre in Piemont

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