sage

A Quote by Helen Rowland on grace, praise, sage, and youth

Call the bald man, "Boy;" make the sage thy toy; greet the youth with solemn face; praise the fat man for his grace.

Helen Rowland (1876 - 1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton on sage

in

The man who smokes, thinks like a sage and acts like a Samaritan.

Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton (1803 - 1873)

Source: Night and Morning. Chap. vi.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on clarity, death, destruction, life, past, sage, teaching, present, and world

Nu Yu was teaching Pü-liang I to be a sage. It was three days before he was able to transcend this world. After he transcended this world I waited for seven days more, and then he was able to transcend all material things. After he transcended all material things, I waited for nine days more and he was able to transcend all life. Having transcended all life, he became as clear and bright as the morning. Having become as clear and bright as the morning, he was able to see the One. Having seen the One, he was then able to abolish the distinction of past and present. Having abolished the past and present, he was then able to enter the realm of neither life nor death. Then, to him, the destruction of life did not mean death and the production of life did not mean life . . .

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on belief, books, freedom, ideas, life, nature, nonsense, originality, paradox, principles, problems, sage, solution, style, and taoism

Chuang Tzu or Chuang Chou was a Taoist sage, living sometime before 250 B.C. The book, by the same name, Chuang Tzu, is believed to contain both his own writings and writings by others about him and his teachings. ". . . the Chuang-Tzu is distinguished by its brilliant and original style, with abundant use of satire, paradox, and seemingly nonsensical stories. Chuang-Tzu emphasizes the relativity of all ideas. . . . He puts forward as the solution to the problems of the human condition, freedom in identification with the universal Tao, or principle of Nature." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 4th Edition.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on purity, sage, and universe

The sage has the sun and moon by his side and the universe under his arm. He blends everything into a harmonious whole. . . . He blends the disparities of ten thousand years into one complete purity. All things are blended like this and mutually involve each other.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on creation, mind, sage, stillness, universe, and water

If water derives lucidity from stillness, how much more the faculties of the mind! The mind of the sage, being in repose, becomes the mirror of the universe, the speculum of all creation.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on action, concern, emptiness, inaction, joy, quiet, sage, silence, stillness, and study

The non-action of the wise man is not inaction. It is not studied. It is not shaken by anything. The sage is quiet because he is not moved, not because he wills to be quiet. . . . Joy does all things without concern. For emptiness, stillness, tranquillity, tastelessness, silence, and non-action are the root of all things.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 13:1, pp. 119, 121

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on body, chance, endurance, joy, and sage

We possess our body by chance and we are already pleased with it. If our physical bodies went through ten thousand transformations without end, how incomparable would this joy be! Therefore the sage roams freely in the realm in which nothing can escape, but all endures.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Siddhartha Gautama Buddha on colors, justice, and sage

Just as the bee takes the nectar and leaves without damaging the color or scent of the flowers, so should the sage act in a village.

Buddha (563 - 483 BC)

Source: Sayings of the Buddha in The Dhammapada, Pali Cannon

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bodhidharma on beginning, body, buddhism, death, elderly, evil, future, good, immortality, life, mind, mortality, mountains, names, nature, past, purity, sacred, sage, sensuality, strength, and suffering

. . . this mind, through endless kalpas without beginning, has never varied. It has never lived or died, appeared or disappeared, increased or decreased. It's not pure or impure, good or evil, past or future. It's not true or false. It's not male or female. It doesn't appear as a monk or a layman, an elder or a novice, a sage or a fool, a buddha or a mortal. It strives for no realization and suffers no karma. It has no strength or form. It's like space. You can't possess it and you can't lose it. Its movements can't be blocked by mountains, rivers, or rock walls. . . . No karma can restrain this real body. But this mind is subtle and hard to see. It's not the same as the sensual mind. Everyone wants to see this mind, and those who move their hands and feet by its light are as many as the grains of sand along the Ganges, but when you ask them, they can't explain it. It's theirs to use. Why don't they see it? . . . Only the wise know this mind, this mind called dharma-nature, this mind called liberation. Neither life nor death can restrain this mind. Nothing can. It's also called the Unstoppable Tathagata, the Incomprehensible, the Sacred Self, the Immortal, the Great Sage. Its names vary but not its essence.

Bodhidharma (c. 440 AD - 528 AD)

Source: The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma, p. 21-23

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content