sacrifice

A Quote by William Somerset Maugham on belief, life, sacrifice, truth, and vanity

Man has always sacrificed truth to his vanity, comfort and advantage. He lives by make-believe.

William Somerset Maugham (1874 - 1965)

Source: The Summing Up, 1938

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Somerset Maugham on opportunity, sacrifice, and women

A woman will always sacrifice herself if you give her the opportunity. It is her favourite form of self-indulgence.

William Somerset Maugham (1874 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Orville Douglas on growth, individuality, nations, sacrifice, spirituality, and value

The growth of bigness has resulted in ruthless sacrifices of human value. The disappearance of free enterprise has submerged the individual in the impersonal corporation. When a nation of shopkeepers is transformed into a nation of clerks, enormous spiritual sacrifices are made.

William Orville Douglas (1898 - 1980)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William G. Simms on duty, exercise, sacrifice, success, and virtue

To be amiable is most certainly a duty but it is not to be exercised at the expense of any virtue. He who seeks to always do the amiable thing can at times be successful only by the sacrifice of his manhood.

William G. Simms (1806 - 1870)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, heart, honor, love, pity, poets, sacrifice, teaching, and writers

He [the writer] must, teach himself that the basest of all things is to be afraid; and, teaching himself that, forget it forever, leaving no room in his workshop for anything but the old verities and truths of the heart, the old universal truths lacking which any story is ephemeral and doomed - love and honor and pity and compassion and sacrifice. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, courage, glory, heart, honor, hope, needs, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, and writers

It is his [the poet's, the writer's] privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, courage, duty, glory, heart, honor, hope, needs, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, and writers

The poet's, the writer's, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of the past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man; it can be one of the props, the pillars, to help him endure and prevail. See Poets & Writers

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the original draft of speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on compassion, endurance, immortality, poets, sacrifice, soul, spirit, and writers

He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. See other 'Poets & Writers'

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the Speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Faulkner on acceptance, belief, compassion, courage, death, duty, endurance, glory, heart, honor, hope, immortality, literature, needs, newspapers, originality, past, pity, poets, pride, privilege, sacrifice, soul, spirit, and time

I decline to accept the end of man. It is easy enough to say that man is immortal simply because he will endure: that when the last ding-dong of doom has clanged and faded from the last worthless rock hanging tideless in the last red and dying evening, that even then there will still be one more sound: that of his puny inexhaustible voice, still talking. I refuse to accept this. I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. The poet's, the writer's, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet's voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail. WILLIAM FAULKNER, address upon receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, Sweden, December 10, 1950. - Faulkner, Essays, Speeches & Public Letters, p. 120 (1951). This text is from Faulkner's original typescript; it was slightly revised from that which he delivered in Stockholm, and which was published in American newspapers at the time (p. 121).

William Faulkner (1897 - 1962)

Source: the original draft of speech receiving the Nobel Prize for literature, Stockholm, 12/10/50

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on heart and sacrifice

Too long a sacrifice Can make a stone of the heart. O when may it suffice?

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: Michael Robartes and the Dancer , 1921. Easter 1916, st. 4

Contributed by: Zaady

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