rules

A Quote by William Penn on excellence, practice, reason, and rules

Many able Gardeners and Husbandmen are yet Ignorant of the Reason of their Calling; as most Artificers are of the Reason of their own Rules that govern their excellent Workmanship. But a Naturalist and Mechanick of this sort is Master of the Reason of both, and might be of the Practice too, if his Industry kept pace with his Speculation; which were every commendable; and without which he cannot be said to be a complete Naturalist or Mechanick.

William Penn (1644 - 1718)

Source: Some Fruits of Solitude In Reflections And Maxims, 1682

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Law on glory, god, life, rules, spirit, and world

Devotion signifies a life given, or devoted, to God. He therefore is the devout man, who lives no longer to his own will, or the way and spirit of the world, but to the sole will of God, who considers God in everything, who serves God in everything, who makes all the parts of his common life, parts of piety, by doing everything in the name of God, and under such rules as are conformable to His glory.

William Law (1686 - 1761)

Source: A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Law on bitterness, custom, heart, kindness, learning, life, nature, religion, repentance, rules, sorrow, soul, and time

Repentance is but a kind of table-talk, till we see so much of the deformity of our inward nature as to be in some degree frightened and terrified at the sight of it. . . . A plausible form of an outward life, that has only learned rules and modes of religion by use and custom, often keeps the soul for some time at ease, though all its inward root and ground of sin has never been shaken or molested, though it has never tasted of the bitter waters of repentance and has only known the want of a Saviour by hearsay. But things cannot pass thus: sooner or later repentance must have a broken and a contrite heart; we must with our blessed Lord go over the brook Cedron, and with Him sweat great drops of sorrow before He can say for us, as He said for Himself: "It is finished."

William Law (1686 - 1761)

Source: Christian Regeneration

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Will H. Nays on belief, business, community, confidence, debt, duty, enemies, good, government, observation, people, promises, rules, and society

We hear a good deal about business confidence, which means confidence of business in itself, in its government, and in its capacity for expansion. But confidence is only another way of saying that people believe each other, keep their promises, pay their debts, and regard their duty to society. As long as business observes these rules, it will have the confidence of the community and it will be safe from all of the irresponsible attacks of its enemies.

Will H. Nays

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Wheeler McMillen on animals, belief, blessings, children, cities, citizenship, communism, dance, earth, freedom, god, good, honor, labor, laws, liberty, magic, managers, men, men and women, miracles, nature, neighbors, peace, people, rules, sc

We are American farmers. We are Americans. We are farmers. Our grandsires freed this virgin continent,plowed it from East to West, and gave it to us.This land is for us and for our children tomake richer and more fruitful. We grow foods, fibers - fifteen times asmuch as we use. We grow men and women -- farmers, Presidents, and Senators, generals of industry,captains of commerce, missionaries, builders. Communists would call us capitalists, because we own land and we own tools. Capitalists might choose to call us laborers,because we work with our hands. Others may call us managers, because wedirect men and manage materials. Our children call us "Dad." We are also deacons, stockholders, mechanics, veterinarians, electricians, schoolboard members, Rotarians, voters, scientists,neighbors, men of good will. Our rules are Nature's rules, the laws of God. We command the magic of the seasons andthe miracles of science, because we obey Nature's rules. Our raw materials are soil and seed, animals, the atmosphere and the rain, and the mighty sun. We work with brains. We toil with musclesof steel, fed by the fires of lightning and byoils from the inner earth. We are partners with the laboratory, withthe factory, and with all the people. We provide industry with ever-renewableraw materials from the inexhaustible world ofplants. We buy products from the labor ofevery fellow-citizen.Our efficiencies have raised great cities andhappy towns, and have given all the peoplemeat and bread. We believe in work and in honor We believe in freedom. We are grateful for the American freedomthat has let us earn so many blessings. We know that liberty is our most preciouspossession. At the ballot-boxes and on thebattlefield we shall defend it. We have proven a new pattern of abun-dance. We pray that we may also help tomake a pattern for peace.

Wheeler McMillen

Source: American Farmers

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by W. W. Broadbent, MD, PhD on assumptions, crisis, future, good, misery, past, reality, rules, and world

If you're interested in misery, 1- always try to look good in front of others; 2- always live in a world of assumptions and treat each assumption as though it's a reality; 3- relate to every new situation as if it is a small crisis; 4- always live in the future or the past; and 5- occasionally stomp on yourself for being so dumb as to follow the first four rules.

W. W. Broadbent

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ursula K. Le Guin on art, boredom, children, despair, evil, facts, habits, happiness, intelligence, joy, laws, life, losing, maturity, nobility, pain, passion, people, police, praise, rules, secrets, simplicity, slavery, society, stupidity, tr

They did not use swords, or keep slaves. They were not barbarians. I do not know the rules and laws of their society, but I suspect that they were singularly few. As they did without monarchy and slavery, so they also got on without the stock exchange, the advertisement, the secret police, and the bomb. Yet I repeat that these were not simple folk, not dulcet shepherds, noble savages, bland utopians. They were not less complex than us. The trouble is that we have a bad habit, encouraged by pedants and sophisticates, of considering happiness as something rather stupid. Only pain is intellectual, only evil interesting. This is the treason of the artist: a refusal to admit the banality of evil and the terrible boredom of pain. If you can't lick 'em, join 'em. If it hurts, repeat it. But to praise despair is to condemn delight, to embrace violence is to lose hold of everything else. We have almost lost hold, we can no longer describe a happy man, nor make any celebration of joy. How can I tell you about the people of Omelas? They were not naive and happy children - though their children were, in fact happy. They were mature, intelligent, passionate adults whose lives were not wretched

Ursula K. Le Guin (1929 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on genius and rules

Could we teach taste or genius by rules, they would be no longer taste and genius.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on life, people, rules, and success

Two rules of success in life: 1. Don't tell people everything you know.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by R.L. Sharpe on books, eternity, life, people, and rules

Isn't it strange that princes and kings,
And clowns that caper in sawdust rings,
And common people like you and me
Are builders for eternity?

Each is given a bag of tools,
A shapeless mass, a book of rules;
And each must make - ere life has flown -
A stumbling block or a stepping stone.

R.L. Sharpe

Contributed by: Zaady

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