rudeness

A Quote by Lewis Carroll on rudeness, abruptness, and uniqueness

'I took a corkscrew from the shelf:
I went to wake them up myself.

And when I found the door was locked,
I pulled and pushed and knocked.

And when I found the door was shut,
I tried to turn the handle, but - '

There was a long pause.
'Is that all?' Alice timidly asked.
'That's all,' said Humpty Dumpty.  Good-bye.'
This was rather sudden, Alice thought: but, after such a very strong hint that she ought to be going, she felt that it would hardly be civil to stay.  So she got up, and held out her hand.  'Good-bye, till we meet again!' she said as cheerfully as she could.
'I shouldn't know you again if we did meet... you're so exactly like other people.'

Lewis Carroll (1832 - 1898)

Source: Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, Pages: Chapter 6

Contributed by: Tsuya

A Quote by William Wordsworth on rudeness

May no rude hand deface it, And its forlorn hic jacet!

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Ellen Irwin.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition, belief, country, death, fortune, friendship, honor, joy, judgment, life, love, lovers, men, patience, respect, rudeness, senses, silence, slavery, tears, and wisdom

BRUTUS: Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear: believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: - Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on rudeness and worth

You are not worth the dust which the rude wind Blows in your face.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Lear, IV, ii, 30

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on faith, home, rebellion, and rudeness

Unthread the rude eye of rebellion, And welcome home again discarded faith.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King John, Act 5, scene 4.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on art, bitterness, friendship, ingratitude, life, and rudeness

Blow, blow, thou winter wind, Thou art not so unkind As man's ingratitude: Thy tooth is not so keen, Because thou art not seen, Although thy breath be rude. Heigh-ho! sing, heigh-ho! unto the green holly: Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly. Then heigh-ho! the holly! This life is most jolly. Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky, That dost not bite so nigh As benefits forgot: Though thou the waters warp, Thy sting is not so sharp As friend remember'd not.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act 2, scene 7.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on rudeness and sleep

Each in his narrow cell forever laid, The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Stanza 4.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on america, civilization, community, conflict, conquest, day, debt, humanity, idleness, impatience, interest, judgment, mankind, morality, nations, needs, rudeness, rules, sentimentality, stability, success, war, and world

Theodore Roosevelt, impatient with the excesses of "purely sentimental historians," authored his own stirring vindication of America's relations with the Indians: Looked at from the standpoint of the ultimate result, there was little real difference to the Indian whether the land was taken by treaty or by war. . . . No treaty could be satisfactory to the whites, no treaty served the needs of humanity and civilization, unless it gave the land to the Americans as unreservedly as any successful war. Whether the whites won the land by treaty, by armed conflict, or, as was actually the case, by a mixture of both, mattered comparatively little so long as the land was won. It was all-important that it should be won, for the benefit of civilization and in the interests of mankind. It is, indeed, a warped, perverse, and silly morality which would forbid a course of conquest that has turned whole continents into the seats of mighty and flourishing civilized nations. . . . It is as idle to apply to savages the rules of international morality which obtain between stable and cultured communities, as it would be to judge the fifth-century English conquest of Britain by the standards of to-day. The most ultimately righteous of all wars is a war with savages, though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. . . . It is of incalculable importance that America, Australia, and Siberia should pass out of the hands of their red, black, and yellow aboriginal owners, and become the heritage of the dominant world races.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Source: The Winning of the West: Book IV, 1896

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Swami Sivananda on arrogance, disobedience, nature, and rudeness

Arrogance is a mixture of impertinence, disobedience, indiscipline, rudeness, harshness, and a self-assertive nature.

Swami Sivananda

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on men, mind, nature, people, rudeness, slavery, value, and work

We are so vain as to set the highest value upon those things to which nature has assigned the lowest place. What can be more coarse and rude in the mind than the precious metals, or more slavish and dirty than the people that dig and work them? And yet they defile our minds more than our bodies, and make the possessor fouler than the artificer of them. Rich men, in fine, are only the greater slaves.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

Contributed by: Zaady

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