reverie

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on image, reverie, imagination, and objectivity

The image can only be studied through the image, by dreaming images as they gather in reverie. It is a non-sense to claim to study imagination objectively since one really receives the image only if he admires it. Already in comparing one image to another, one runs the risk of losing participation in its individuality.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 53

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on observe, dream, reverie, poet, and peace

It is quite evident that a barrier must be cleared in order to escape the psychologists and enter into a realm which is not "auto-observant", where we ourselves no longer divide ourselves into observer and observed. Then the dreamer is completely dissolved in his reverie. His reverie is his silent life. It is that silent peace which the poet wants to convey to us.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 45

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reverie, dream, poet, and poetry

In living off all the reflecting light furnished by poets, the I which dreams the reverie reveals itself not as poet but as poetizing I.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 22

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reverie, society, world, tranquility, and time

Cosmic reveries separate us from project reveries. They situate us in a world and not in a society. The cosmic reverie possesses a sort of stability or tranquility. It helps us escape time. It is a state.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 14

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on past, soul, time, universe, and reverie

The past of the soul is so distant! The soul does not live on the edge of time. It finds its rest in the universe imagined by reverie.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 14..15

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reverie, word, dream, writing, pen, and page

Doesn't reverie ramify the sentence which has been begun? A word is a bud attempting to become a twig. How can one not dream while writing? It is the pen which dreams. The blank page gives the right to dream. If only one could write for himself alone.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 17

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on words, reverie, past, and time

Words, in their distant past, have the past of my reveries.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 17

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on memory, childhood, image, dream, and reverie

If there is any realm where distinction is especially difficult, it is the realm of childhood memories, the realm of beloved images harbored in memory since childhood. These memories which live by the image and in virtue of the image become, at certain times of our lives and particularly during the quiet age, the origin and matter of a complex reverie: the memory dreams, and reverie remembers.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 20

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on universe, reverie, dream, happiness, destiny, gift, and work

A universe comes to contribute to our happiness when reverie comes to accentuate our repose. You must tell the man who wants to dream well to begin by being happy. Then reverie plays out its veritable destiny; it becomes poetic reverie and by it, in it, everything becomes beautiful. If the dreamer had "the gift" he would turn his reverie into a work. And this work would be grandiose since the dreamed world is automatically grandiose.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 12..13

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Gaston Bachelard on reality, reverie, and psyche

The demands of our reality function require that we adapt to reality, that we constitute ourselves as a reality and that we manufacture works which are realities. But doesn't reverie, by its very essence, liberate us from the reality function? From the moment it is considered in all its simplicity, it is perfectly evident that reverie bears witness to a normal useful irreality function which keeps the human psyche on the fringe of all the brutality of a hostile and foreign non-self.

Gaston Bachelard (1884 - 1962)

Source: The Poetics of Reverie, Pages: 13

Contributed by: Chris

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