religion

A Quote by Earon on belief, disbelief, critical thinking, novels, films, politics, economics, technology, religion, suspending disbelief, and uncritical acceptance

"The price of temporarily suspending our disbelief while reading novels and viewing films is small.  The price of suspending our disbelief (turning off our critical thinking) in matters of politics, economics, technology and religion is immense.

Earon Davis

Source: Earon Davis

Contributed by: Earon

A Quote by Earon on academia, university, college, education, corruption, academic life, business, religion, industry, and government

Academia was created by business, religion and government as an enclosure for intelligent, altruistic people to keep them occupied and feeling important, and distracted from exposing corruption and working for change.  Fortunately, this strategy hasn't always succeeded.

Earon Davis

Source: Earon Davis

Contributed by: Earon

A Quote by Anon on tolerance, religion, and indifference

Religious tolerance is not religious indifference. Tolerance means to value the right of another person to hold beliefs that you know are absolutely wrong.

Anon

Contributed by: Lion

A Quote by Hans Kung on peace, religion, and earth

There will be peace on earth when there is peace among the world religions.

Hans Kung

Contributed by: Lion

A Quote by unknown on the dalai lama, religion, spirituality, oneness, unity, and one

There are many religions seeking to bring comfort and happiness to
humanity, just as there are many treatments for a particular disease.
All religions endeavor to help living beings avoid misery and find
happiness. Although we may prefer one religious perspective to another,
there is a much stronger case for unity, stemming from common desires
of the human heart. Each religion works to lessen suffering and
contribute to the world; conversion is not the point. I do not think
about converting others to Buddhism or merely furthering the Buddhist
cause. Instead, I try to think of how I as a Buddhist can contribute to
the happiness of all living beings.

unknown

Contributed by: themanifest-station.com

A Quote by Dalai Lama on spirituality, buddism, religion, oneness, one, unity, self actualization, self empowerment, knowledge, and wisdom

There are many religions seeking to bring comfort and happiness to humanity, just as there are many treatments for a particular disease. All religions endeavor to help living beings avoid misery and find happiness. Although we may prefer one religious perspective to another, there is a much stronger case for unity, stemming from common desires of the human heart. Each religion works to lessen suffering and contribute to the world; conversion is not the point. I do not think about converting others to Buddhism or merely furthering the Buddhist cause. Instead, I try to think of how I as a Buddhist can contribute to the happiness of all living beings.

Dalai Lama

Source: How to See Yourself As You Really Are, Pages: 15

Contributed by: themanifest-station.com

A Quote by Isha De Lubicz on idol, idolatry, religion, god, and projection

Many are those who project their imaginings outside themselves and create gods “in their own image and likeness.”  The powers they would adore are those that can grant them all the boons they yearn for in this world and the next.  They are answered by Christ’s word:  “Ye know not what ye ask” (Mark 10:38).

            Their wish is for an idol to protect and favor them, or else for a divine being who can be loved possessively.  But the paradises, like gods, are made by men according to their desires, and their misfortune will be that they will often find what they have imagined.  But what we can imagine is no part of the inexpressible Divine.     

Isha De Lubicz

Source: Opening of the Way: A Practical Guide to the Wisdom of Ancient Egypt, Pages: 78

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Isha De Lubicz on confusion, discernment, and religion

... For he will know that behind all religions there is only one Truth, and the revelation of this truth through their different myths and symbols brings harmony instead of discord.  This clarification will only be resisted by those who want to obscure the original teaching in order to assure their own control over the minds and consciences of men.

            The difficulty of the present age is caused by the confused variety of beliefs and opinions.  The restlessness of our daily life, and the falsity of conventional artificial standards in morality and aesthetics, have corrupted our vision, until it seems that nothing short of catastrophe can arouse us to a truer awareness.  We confuse the discernment of reality with our personal opinion, and intellectual judgment with recognition of truth.

Isha De Lubicz

Source: Opening of the Way: A Practical Guide to the Wisdom of Ancient Egypt, Pages: 7

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by sam harris on belief, religion, stem cell, and stem cell research

There are sources of irrationality other than religious faith, of course, but none of them are celebrated for their role in shaping public policy.  Supreme Court justices are not in the habit of praising our nation or its reliance upon astrology, or for its  wealth of UFO sightings, or for exemplifying the various reasoning biases that psychologists have found to be more or less endemic to our species.  Only mainstream religious dogmatism receives the unqualified support of government.  And yet, religious faith obscures uncertainty where uncertainty manifestly exists, allowing the unknown, the implausible, and the patently false to achieve primacy over facts.

            Consider the present debate over research on human embryonic stem cells.  The problem with this research, from the religious point of view is simple:  it entails the destruction of human embryos.  The embryos in question will have been cultures in vitro (not removed from a woman’s body) and permitted to grow for three to five days.  AT this stage of development, an embryo is called a blastocyst and consists of about 150 cells arranged in a microscopic sphere.  Interior to the blastocyst is a small group of about 30 embryonic stem cells.  These cells have two properties that make them of such abiding interest to scientists:  as stem cells, they can remain in an unspecialized state, reproducing themselves through cell division for long periods of time (a population of such cells living in culture is known as a cell line); stem cells are also pluripotent, which means they have the potential to become any specialized cell in the human body – neurons of the brain and spinal chord, insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, muscle cells of the heart, and so forth.

            Here is what we know.  We know that much can be learned from research on embryonic stem cells.  In particular, such research nay give us further insight into the processes of cell division and cell differentiation.  This would almost certainly shed new light on those medical conditions, like cancer and birth defects, that seem to be merely a matter of processes gone awry.  We also know that research on embryonic cells requires the destruction of human embryos at the 150-cell stage.  There is not the slightest reason to believe, however, that such embryos have the capacity to sense pain, to suffer, or to experience the loss of life in any way at all.  What is indisputable is that there are millions of human beings who do have these capacities, and who currently suffer from traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal chord.  Millions more suffer from Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.  Millions more suffer from stroke and heart disease, from burns, from diabetes, from rheumatoid arthritis, from Purkinje cell degeneration, from Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and from vision and hearing loss.  We know that embryonic stem cells promise to be a renewable source of tissues and organs that might alleviate such suffering in the not to distant future.

            Enter faith:  we now find ourselves living in a world in which college-educated politicians hurl impediments in the way of such research because they are concerned about the fate of  single cells.  Their concern is not merely that a collection of 150 cells may suffer its destruction.  Rather, they believe that even a human zygote (a fertilized egg) should be accorded all the protections of a fully developed human being.  Such a cell, after al, has the potential to become a full developed human being..  But given our recent advances in the biology of cloning, as much can be said of almost every cell in the human body.  By the measure of a cell’s potential whenever the president scratches his nose he is now engaged in a diabolical culling of souls.

            Out of deference to some rather poorly specified tenets of Christine doctrine (after all, nothing in the Bible suggests that killing human embryos, or even human fetuses, is the equivalent of killing a human being), the U.S. House of Representatives voted effectively to ban embryonic stem-cell research on February 27, 2003.

            No rational approach to ethics would have led us to such an impasse.  Our present policy on human stem cells has been shaped by beliefs that are divorced from every reasonable intuition we might form about the possible experience of living systems.  In neurological terms, we surely visit more suffering upon this earth by killing a fly than by killing a human blastocyst, to say nothing of a human zygote (flies, after all, have 100,000 cells in their brains alone).  Of course, the point at which we fully acquire our humanity, and or capacity to suffer, remains an open question.  But anyone who would dogmatically insist that these traits must arise coincident with the moment of conception has nothing to contribute, apart from his ignorance, to this debate.  Those opposed to therapeutic stem-cell research on religious grounds constitute the biological and ethical

Equivalent of a flat-earth society.  Our discourse on the subject should reflect this.  In this area of public policy alone, the accommodations that we have made to faith will do nothing but enshrine a perfect immensity of human suffering for decades to come.

sam harris

Source: The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason, Pages: 165..6

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by sam harris on world government, integration, religion, belief, and faith

We should, I think, look upon modern despotisms as hostage crises.  Kim Jong Il has 30 million hostages.  Saddam Hussein has twenty-five million.  The clerics in Iran have seventy million or more.  It does not matter that many hostages have been so brainwashed that they will fight their would-be liberators to the death.  They are held prisoner twice over – by tyranny and by their own ignorance.  The developed world must, somehow, come to their rescue.  Jonathon Glover seems right to suggest that we need “something along the lines of a strong and properly funded permanent UN force, together with clear criteria for intervention and an international court to authorize it.”  We can say it even more simply:  we need a world government.  How else will a war between the United States and China ever become as unlikely as a war between Texas and Vermont?  We are a very long way from even thinking about the possibility of a world government, to say nothing of creating one.  It would require a degree of economic, cultural, and moral integration that we may never achieve.  The diversity of our religious beliefs constitutes a primary obstacle here.  Given what most of us believe about God, it is at present unthinkable that human beings will ever identify themselves merely as human beings, disavowing all lesser affiliations,  World government does seem a long way off – so long that we may not survive the trip.

sam harris

Source: The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason, Pages: 151

Contributed by: HeyOK

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