relatives

A Quote by Phyllis McGinley on borrowing, brides, children, christianity, fame, family, fatherhood, faults, generosity, gold, hunger, love, luck, motherhood, patience, poetry, problems, relatives, saints, sharing, sister, soul, thinking, and wine

The subject of the poem was Bridget of Kildare (450-523), a Christian lass among the Druids in Ireland. Saint Bridget was A problem child. Although a lass Demure and mild, And one who strove To please her dad, Saint Bridget drove The family mad. For here's the fault in Bridget lay: She WOULD give everything away. To any soul Whose luck was out She'd give her bowl Of stirabout; She'd give her shawl, Divide her purse With one or all. And what was worse, When she ran out of things to give She'd borrow from a relative. Her father's gold, Her grandsire's dinner, She'd hand to cold and hungry sinner; Give wine, give meat, No matter whose; Take from her feet The very shoes, And when her shoes had gone to others, Fetch forth her sister's and her mother's. She could not quit. She had to share; Gave bit by bit The silverware, The barnyard geese, The parlor rug, Her little niece-'s christening mug, Even her bed to those in want, And then the mattress of her aunt. An easy touch For poor and lowly, She gave so much And grew so holy That when she died Of years and fame, The countryside Put on her name, And still the Isles of Erin fidget With generous girls named Bride or Bridget. Well, one must love her. Nonetheless, In thinking of her Givingness, There's no denial She must have been A sort of trial Unto her kin. The moral, too, seems rather quaint. WHO had the patience of a saint, From evidence presented here? Saint Bridget? Or her near and dear?

Phyllis McGinley (1905 - 1978)

Source: "The Giveaway," from The Love Letters ofd Phyllis McGinley, New York, Viking Press, 1957

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Paul Klee on beauty, certainty, darkness, existence, relatives, shame, and women

Beauty is as relative as light and dark. Thus, there exists no beautiful woman, none at all, because you are never certain that a still far more beautiful woman will not appear and completely shame the supposed beauty of the first.

Paul Klee (1879 - 1940)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mark Twain on absence, criticism, discovery, people, relatives, and superstition

I have criticized absent people so often, and then discovered, to my humiliation, that I was talking with their relatives, that I have grown superstitious about that sort of thing and dropped it.

Mark Twain (1835 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lyman Littlefield on acceptance, adversity, body, careers, consequences, death, desires, endings, endurance, existence, family, finance, future, god, investment, joy, life, mortality, motherhood, peace, relatives, rest, sorrow, spirit, sufferi

As soon as it was light, I started to see Mr. Benjamin L. Shaw and met him on his way to inquire as to my mother's condition. This gentleman was a relative, himself and my mother being first cousins, in consequence of which and being a man of great wealth, he had extended to the family much financial assistance. He asked if my mother had made any request before her death. I told him of her desire to be buried at Nauvoo. He said that her wishes must be complied with. We went together to the undertaker and he ordered a coffin, and a suitable strong box in which the casket containing her remains were to be placed. Some ladies came and she was suitably made ready for burial. The habiliments with which she was to be clothed were made and her body was invested with the robes for her final rest. She was placed in the coffin and then, O, how peaceful and pleasant seemed her rest! Then, my mother, your troubles were ended. The storms of life were passed and your spirit could soar to a world of peace and joy. No more shall you endure the tempests of mortal suffering or the winds of malevolence roar around your pathway, nor the clouds of adversity shut out the genial sunlight of connubial joys. Your career of sorrow now is over. Well and patiently you have endured the reverses attendant upon the mortal existence. You have accepted of God's revealed and redeeming truth, and the celestial consolations of the future life will heal the wounds inflicted along the dreary shores of this life.

Lyman Littlefield

Source: Lyman Littlefield Reminiscences (1888), p.138 - p.139

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Taylor on brothers, children, companions, friendship, god, good, husbands, kindness, relatives, sister, and wives

It is true, we do not like to lose a good, kind companion, a wife, a husband, a child, a brother, a sister, or any of our near and dear friends or relatives; but we have to do it, and it is right and proper that we should. They go a little before us; when we get there they will receive and welcome us and say, "God bless you, you have come at last." That is the way I look at it. I ex pect to strike hands and embrace my friends who have gone before.

John Taylor (1808 - 1887)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joe Mcdonald on business, crisis, meaning, mistakes, relatives, responsibility, wedding, words, and world

One of my favorite words is "miscommunication." Its meaning has become so broad as to justify everything from the Middle East crisis to why a relative missed the wedding. In the business world, vendors and clients alike use it to explain away huge mistakes and, best of all, without assigning responsibility to anyone. It is the verbal Get-Out-of-Jail card for the '90s.

Joe Mcdonald

Source: Washington Post

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jean-Luc Godard on beauty, composers, difficulty, eternity, fashion, passion, and relatives

Beauty is composed of an eternal, invariable element whose quantity is extremely difficult to determine, and a relative element which might be, either by turns or all at once, period, fashion, moral, passion.

Jean-Luc Godard

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on anguish, appearance, divinity, eternity, existence, experience, god, knowledge, maxims, meaning, names, nostalgia, reality, and relatives

The Names . . . have existed from all eternity: these Names are designated as "Lords" (Arbab), who often have all the appearance of hypostases though they cannot strictly be defined as such. We know them only by our knowledge of ourselves (that is the basic maxim). God describes Himself to us through ourselves. Which means that the divine Names are essentially relative to the beings who name them, since these beings discover and experience them in their own mode of being. . . . Thus the divine Names have meaning and full reality only through and for beings . . . in which they are manifested. Likewise from all eternity, these forms, substrate of the divine Names, have existed in the divine Essence (A 'yan thabita). And it is these latent individualities who from all eternity have aspired to concrete being in actu. Their aspiration is itself nothing other than the nostalgia of the divine Names yearning to be revealed. And this nostalgia of the divine Names is nothing other than the sadness of the unrevealed God, the anguish He experiences in His unknownness and occultation.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 114-115

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on clothes, men, questions, and relatives

It is an interesting question how far men would retain their relative rank if they were divested of their clothes.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Groucho Marx on cities, order, relatives, and unhappiness

It isn't necessary to have relatives in Kansas City in order to be unhappy.

Groucho Marx (1895 - 1977)

Contributed by: Zaady

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