relationships

A Quote by Florence R. Krall on opinions, relationships, understanding, communication, love, friends, complexity, critical, viewpoint, and silence

When we try to explain the complexity of what we see to others who demand that things be laid out in straight paths, they often become resistent and critical... when our viewpoint repeatedly falls on deaf ears, we become silent - avoid confrontation. One source of human suffering arises when our words and actions are perceived, by those we serve or love, in a light of being different from that intended.

Florence R. Krall

Source: unknown

Contributed by: Peggy J

A Quote by Anne Morrow Lindbergh on love, relationships, security, impermanence, delusion, and flow

When you love someone, you do not love them all the time, in exactly the same way, from moment to moment. It is an impossibility. It is even a lie to pretend to. And yet, this is exactly what most of us demand. We have so little faith in the ebb and flow of life, of love, of relationships. We leap at the flow of time and resist in terror its ebb. We are afraid it will never return. We insist on permanency, on duration, on continuity; when the only continuity possible in life, as in love, is in growth, in fluidity – in freedom. The only real security is not in owning or possessing, not in demanding or expecting, not in hoping, even. Security in a relationship lies neither in looking back to what it was, nor forward to what it might be, but living in the present and accepting it as it is now. For relationships, too, must be like islands. One must accept them for what they are here and now, within their limits – islands surrounded and interrupted by the sea, continuously visited and abandoned by the tides. One must accept the serenity of the winged life, of ebb and flow, of intermittency.

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Source: Gift from the Sea: 50th Anniversary Edition

Contributed by: Larry

A Quote by Dossie Easton on love, relationships, and polyamory

A slut shares her sexuality the way a philanthropist shares his money — because they have a lot to share, because it makes them happy to share it, because sharing makes the world a better place.

“Easy”: Is there, we wonder, some value in being difficult?

To believe that God doesn't like sex is like believing that God doesn't like you: we all wind up carrying a secret shame for our own perfectly natural sexual desires and fulfillments. We prefer the beliefs of a woman we met who is a devoted churchgoer. She told us that when she was about five years old, she discovered the joys of masturbation in the back seat of the family car, tucked under a warm blanket on a long trip. It felt so wonderful that she concluded that the existence of her clitoris was proof positive that God loved her.

We have been taught by our culture that when our partner has sex with another, we have lost something. Not to sound dumb, but we are confused. What have we lost?

We measure the ethics of a good slut not by the number of his partners, but by the respect and care with which he treats them.

It is amazing to us to think … that most people in our culture have never had a chance to watch another person enjoy sex. No wonder we worry so much about our appearance.

Joe was very possessive. I was perfectly faithful. He would beat me, screaming imprecations, 'You slut!' when another man looked at me. After I left, I decided he was right — I am a slut, I want to be a slut, I will never promise monogamy again. After all, why would any care who I fucked? I will never be a piece of property again, no matter how valuable that property is considered. Joe made a feminist of me. A feminist slut.

 Myth #3: Loving someone makes it OK to control his behavior.

Sex is for pleasure, a complete and worthwhile goal in and of itself. People have sex because it feels very good, and then they feel good about themselves. So we are proud to reclaim the word “slut” as a term of approval, even endearment. To us, a slut is a person of any gender who has the courage to lead life according to the radical proposition that sex is nice and pleasure is good for you.

Some people consider any form of sex education to be child abuse, and many do not feel that children should have any information at all about adult sexual activities. …How are we to teach our children to say 'no' to an abusive adult if we are not frank about what it is that they should say no to?

We see ourselves surrounded by the 'walking wounded' — by people who have been deeply, if not irrevocably, injured by fear, shame, and hatred of their own sexual selves. We believe that happy connected sex is the cure for these wounds, that it is important, possibly even essential, to most people's sense of self-worth, to their belief that life is good. We have never met anyone who had low self-esteem at the moment of orgasm.

We've … been called “indiscriminate” in our sexuality, which we resent: we can always tell our lovers apart.

 When both genders feel free to answer 'yes' or 'no' with no concern for anything but their own desires, a truer understanding, and a more positive sexuality, can be achieved.

Dossie tells the story of a woman friend of hers back in the '70s who, as an experiment, sat patiently in a singles' bar one night, being approached by many men, until finally one to whom she felt attracted came along and began to flirt. She asked him nicely if he would like to come back to her place and fuck. He swallowed his ice. It took the poor fellow a couple of minutes before he could talk coherently again, and when they actually got to her place he found himself impotent. That's how deeply ingrained some of these cultural stereotypes can be.

[Wilhelm] Reich theorized that without the suppression of sexuality and the imposition of anti-sexual morality, you could not have an authoritarian government, because people would be free from shame, and would trust their own sense of right and wrong. Such people are unlikely to march to war against their wishes, and we would like to think they would be unlikely to agree to operate the death camps too.

Dossie Easton

Source: The Ethical Slut: A Guide to Infinite Sexual Possibilities

Contributed by: Kundan

A Quote by Emma Goldman on love, relationships, forgiveness, and gratitude

We are told that people stay in love because of chemistry, or because they remain intrigued with each other, because of many kindnesses, because of luck. But part of it has got to be forgiveness and gratefulness.

Emma Goldman (1869 - 1940)

Contributed by: Jessica

A Quote by Neale Donald Walsch on relationships, purpose, and self

The purpose of a relationship is to decide what part of yourself you’d like to see “show up,” not what part of another you can capture and hold.

There can be only one purpose for relationships—and for all of life: to be and to decide Who You Really Are.

Neale Donald Walsch

Source: Conversations with God : An Uncommon Dialogue (Book 1)

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Neale Donald Walsch on love, relationships, and choice

Yea, let all those who have ears to hear, listen. For I tell you this: at the critical juncture in all human relationships, there is only one question: What would love do now?

Neale Donald Walsch

Source: Conversations with God : An Uncommon Dialogue (Book 1)

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Neale Donald Walsch on relationships, opportunity, life, growth, self, potential, and love

If you both agree at a conscious level that the purpose of your relationship is to create an opportunity, not an obligation—an opportunity for growth, for full Self expression, for lifting your lives to their highest potential, for healing every false thought or small idea you ever had about you, and for ultimate reunion with God through the communion of your two souls—if you take that vow instead of the vows you’ve been taking—the relationship has begun on a very good note.

Neale Donald Walsch

Source: Conversations with God : An Uncommon Dialogue (Book 1)

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Eckhart Tolle on listening, being, presence, awareness, consciousness, and relationships


True listening is another way of bringing stillness into the relationship. When you truly listen to someone, the dimension of stillness arises and becomes an essential part of the relationship. But true listening is a rare skill. Usually, the greater part of a person’s attention is taken up by their thinking. At best, they may be evaluating your words or preparing the next thing to say. Or they may not be listening at all, lost in their own thoughts.

True listening goes far beyond auditory perception. It is the arising of alert attention, a space of presence in which the words are being received. The words now become secondary. They may be meaningful or they may not make sense. Far more important than what you are listening to is the act of listening itself, the space of conscious presence that arises as you listen. That space is a unifying field of awareness in which you meet the other person without the separative barriers created by conceptual thinking. And now the other person is no longer “other.” In that space, you are joined together as one awareness, one consciousness.

Eckhart Tolle

Source: Stillness Speaks

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Eckhart Tolle on relationships, self, love, beauty, essense, and being

When you look upon another human being and feel great love toward them, or when you contemplate beauty in nature and something within you responds deeply to it, close your eyes for a moment and feel the essence of that love or that beauty within you, inseparable from who you are, your true nature. The outer form is a temporary reflection of what you are within, in your essence. That is why love and beauty can never leave you, although all outer forms will.

Eckhart Tolle

Source: Stillness Speaks

Contributed by: Gaia Team

A Quote by Eckhart Tolle on relationships, ego, actions, thoughts, emotions, presence, and love


As long as the ego runs your life, most of your thoughts, emotions, and actions arise from desire and fear. In relationships you then either want or fear something from the other person.

What you want from them may be pleasure or material gain, recognition, praise or attention, or a strengthening of your sense of self through comparison and through establishing that you are, have, or know more than they. What you fear is that the opposite may be the case, and they may diminish your sense of self in some way.

When you make the present moment the focal point of your attention — instead of using it as a means to an end — you go beyond the ego and beyond the unconscious compulsion to use people as a means to an end, the end being self-enhancement at the cost of others. When you give your fullest attention to whoever you are interacting with, you take past and future out of the relationship, except for practical matters. When you are fully present with everyone you meet, you relinquish the conceptual identity you made for them — your interpretation of who they are and what they did in the past — and are able to interact without the egoic movements of desire and fear. Attention, which is alert stillness, is the key.

How wonderful to go beyond wanting and fearing in your relationships. Love does not want or fear anything.

Eckhart Tolle

Source: Stillness Speaks

Contributed by: Gaia Team

Syndicate content