reflection

A Quote by Stuart Kauffman on accidents, argument, effort, facts, fame, growth, history, justice, needs, order, plants, reflection, and understanding

Pick up a pinecone and count the spiral rows of scales. You may find eight spirals winding up to the left and 13 spirals winding up to the right, or 13 left and 21 right spirals, or other pairs of numbers. The striking fact is that these pairs of numbers are adjacent numbers in the famous Fibonacci series: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21. . . . Here, each term is the sum of the previous two terms. The phenomenon is well known and called phyllotaxis. Many are the efforts of biologists to understand why pinecones, sunflowers, and many other plants exhibit this remarkable pattern. Organisms do the strangest things, but all these odd things need not reflect selection or historical accident. Some of the best efforts to understand phyllotaxis appeal to a form of self-organization. Paul Green, at Stanford, has argued persuasively that the Fibonacci series is just what one would expect as the simplest self-repeating pattern that can be generated by the particular growth processes in the growing tips of the tissues that form sunflowers, pinecones, and so forth. Like a snowflake and its sixfold symmetry, the pinecone and its phyllotaxis may be part of order for free . . .

Stuart Kauffman

Source: Stuart Kauffman in At Home in the Universe, Oxford University Press, 1995, p 151.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen King on darkness, happiness, logic, reflection, sanity, and universe

There's a Mr. Hyde for every happy Jekyll face, a dark face on the other side of the mirror. The brain behind that face never heard of razors, prayers, or the logic of the universe. You turn the mirror sideways and see your face reflected with a sinister left-hand twist, half mad and half sane.

Stephen King (1947 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on genius, kindness, and reflection

There are two kinds of geniuses. The characteristic of the one is roaring, but the lightning is meagre and rarely strikes; the other kind is characterized by reflection by which it constrains itself or restrains the roaring. But the lightning is all the more intense; with the speed and sureness of lightning it hits the selected particular points - and is fatal.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir William Temple on company, distrust, reflection, rules, and value

The best rules to form a young man, are, to talk little, to hear much, to reflect alone upon what has passed in company, to distrust one's own opinions, and value others that deserve it.

Sir William Temple (1881 - 1944)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on reflection

But with the morning cool reflection came.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Chronicles of the Canongate. Chap. iv.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Kingsley William Amis on reflection and wishes

I wish I could have a little tape-and-loudspeaker arrangement sewn into the binding of this magazine, to be triggered off by the light reflected from the reader's eyes on to this part of the page, and set to bawl out at several bels: MORE WILL MEAN WORSE.

Sir Kingsley William Amis (1922 - 1995)

Source: Discussing the idea that many students are unable to get university places. Encounter, July 1960.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Seung Sahn on clarity, correction, life, mind, past, and reflection

In the past, kong-an (koan) practicing meant checking someone's enlightenment. Now we use kong-ans to make our lives correct. . . . You must use kong-ans to take away your opinions. When you take away your opinions, your mind is clear like space, which means from moment to moment you can reflect any situation and respond correctly and meticulously.

Seung Sahn

Source: a Zen teaching, 1992

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on reflection

It is a most mortifying reflection for a man to consider what he has done, compared to what he might have done.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: Boswell's Life, 1770

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Gompers on crime, danger, morality, people, reflection, and welfare

Doing for people what they can and ought to do for themselves is a dangerous experiment. In the last analysis, the welfare of the workers depends upon their own initiative. Whatever is done under the guise of philanthropy or social morality which in any way lessens initiative is the greatest crime that can be committed against the toilers. Let social busybodies and professional "public morals experts" in their fads reflect upon the perils they rashly invite under this pretense of social welfare.

Samuel Gompers (1850 - 1924)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Russell C. Taylor on justice, life, reflection, and service

Service opens windows in your life instead of just mirrors that always reflect yourself.

Russell C. Taylor

Contributed by: Zaady

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