reason

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, animals, beauty, god, nobility, reason, women, work, and world

What a piece of work is a man! how noble in reason! how infinite in faculty! in form and moving how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? man delights not me: no, nor woman neither, though by your smiling you seem to say so.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, spoken by Hamlet, Act II, scene ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on darkness, love, madness, punishment, and reason

ROSALIND But are you so much in love as your rhymes speak? ORLANDO Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much. ROSALIND Love is merely a madness, and, I tell you, deserves as well a dark house and a whip as madmen do: and the reason why they are not so punished and cured is, that the lunacy is so ordinary that the whippers are in love too.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: AS YOU LIKE IT, Act 3, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, day, deed, doubt, envy, friendship, good, heart, honor, ingratitude, judgment, kindness, love, men, nobility, overcoming, perception, pity, power, preparation, privacy, reason, soul, speech, tears, time,

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through: See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar follow'd it, As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knock'd, or no; For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's Statua, Which all the while ran blood, great Cæsar fell, O! what a fall was there, my countrymen; Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors. . . . . Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend. . . . . For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action , nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, death, duty, earth, fatherhood, faults, grief, heart, heaven, impatience, losing, love, mind, nature, nobility, obligation, reason, simplicity, sons, sorrow, understanding, vulgarity, and world

'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet, To give these mourning duties to your father: But, you must know, your father lost a father; That father lost, lost his, and the survivor bound In filial obligation for some term To do obsequious sorrow: but to persever In obstinate condolement is a course Of impious stubbornness; 'tis unmanly grief; It shows a will most incorrect to heaven, A heart unfortified, a mind impatient, An understanding simple and unschool'd: For what we know must be and is as common As any the most vulgar thing to sense, Why should we in our peevish opposition Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven, A fault against the dead, a fault to nature, To reason most absurd: whose common theme Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried, From the first corse till he that died to-day, 'This must be so.' We pray you, throw to earth This unprevailing woe, and think of us As of a father: for let the world take note, You are the most immediate to our throne; And with no less nobility of love Than that which dearest father bears his son, Do I impart toward you.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 1, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Rounseville Alger on men and reason

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Men often make up in wrath what they want in reason.

William Rounseville Alger (1822 - 1905)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Rounseville Alger on reason and sympathy

A crowd always thinks with its sympathy, never with its reason.

William Rounseville Alger (1822 - 1905)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Penn on excellence, practice, reason, and rules

Many able Gardeners and Husbandmen are yet Ignorant of the Reason of their Calling; as most Artificers are of the Reason of their own Rules that govern their excellent Workmanship. But a Naturalist and Mechanick of this sort is Master of the Reason of both, and might be of the Practice too, if his Industry kept pace with his Speculation; which were every commendable; and without which he cannot be said to be a complete Naturalist or Mechanick.

William Penn (1644 - 1718)

Source: Some Fruits of Solitude In Reflections And Maxims, 1682

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Penn on commitment, passion, and reason

Passion is the mob of the man, that commits a riot upon his reason.

William Penn (1644 - 1718)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William James on action, emotion, and reason

The emotions aren't always immediately subject to reason, but they are always immediately subject to action.

William James (1842 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William James on prayer, reason, science, and simplicity

We hear in these days of scientific enlightenment a great deal of discussion about the efficacy of Prayer. Many reasons are given why we should not pray. Others give reasons why we should pray. Very little is said of the reason we do pray. The reason is simple: We pray because we cannot help praying.

William James (1842 - 1910)

Contributed by: Zaady

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