reason

A Quote by William Wordsworth on confidence, reason, sacrifice, self-sacrifice, spirit, and truth

Give unto me, made lowly wise, The spirit of self-sacrifice; The confidence of reason give, And in the light of truth thy bondman let me live!

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Ode to Duty.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on endurance, planning, reason, skill, strength, and women

The reason firm, the temperate will, Endurance, foresight, strength, and skill; A perfect woman, nobly planned, To warn, to comfort, and command.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: She was a Phantom of Delight.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Tyler on reason and time

The reason lightning doesn't strike twice in the same place is that the same place isn't there the second time.

William Tyler

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Strunk, Jr. on machines, reason, words, and writing

Omit needless words. Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts. This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell.

William Strunk (1869 - 1946)

Source: Strunk & White in The Elements of Style, 1918, Third Revision, 1979, p. 23.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on fighting and reason

When valor preys on reason, It eats the sword it fights with.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA, Act 3, Scene 13

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on anger, friendship, horses, questions, and reason

Stay, my lord, And let your reason with your choler question What 'tis you go about: to climb steep hills Requires slow pace at first: anger is like A full-hot horse, who being allow'd his way, Self-mettle tires him. Not a man in England Can advise me like you: be to yourself As you would to your friend.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: KING HENRY VIII, Act 1, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on reason and women

I have no other but a woman's reason: I think him so, because I think him so.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Two Gentlemen of Verona

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, deed, doubt, friendship, good, honor, love, men, power, privacy, reason, speech, wit, words, and worth

Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him: For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know; Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on happiness, heaven, necessity, reason, and virtue

All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens. Teach thy necessity to reason thus; There is no virtue like necessity.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard II, Act i, scene 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on change, citizenship, distrust, divinity, fear, god, instinct, men, proof, reason, and soul

FIRST CITIZEN: Come, come, we fear the worst; all shall be well. THIRD CITIZEN: When clouds appear, wise men put on their cloaks; When great leaves fall, the winter is at hand; When the sun sets, who doth not look for night? Untimely storms make men expect a dearth. All my be well; but if God sort it so. 'Tis more than we deserve, or I expect. SECOND CITIZEN: Truly, the souls of men are full of dread; Ye cannot reason almost with a man That looks not heavily and full of fear. THIRD CITIZEN: Before the times of change, still is it so: By a divine instinct men's minds distrust Ensuing dangers; as, by proof, we see The waters swell before a boisterous storm.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Richard III, Act 1I, Scene 3

Contributed by: Zaady

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