reality

A Quote by Albert Einstein on notion, perception, reality, and science

The belief in an external world independent of the perceiving subject is the basis of all natural science.  Since, however, sense perception only gives information of this external world or of "physical reality" indirectly, we can only grasp the latter by speculative means.  It follows from this that our notions of physical reality can never be final.  We must always be ready to change these notions - that is to say, the axiomatic basis of physics - in order to do justice to perceived facts in the most perfect way.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Source: Systemic Intervention: Philosophy, Methodology, and Practice

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Aldous Huxley on awareness, people, reality, and words

Every individual is at once the beneficiary and the victim of the linguistic tradition into which he has been born - the beneficiary inasmuch as language gives access to the accumulated records of other people's experience, the victim in so far as it confirms him in the belief that reduced awareness is the only awareness and as it bedevils his sense of reality, so that he is all too apt to take his concepts for data, his words for actual things.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: The Doors of Perception

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Anthony De Mello on labels, suffering, truth, opinions, reality, and illusions

The important thing is not to know who "I" is or what "I" is.  You'll never succeed. There are no words for it.  

The important thing is to drop the labels.  

As the Japanese Zen masters say, "Don't seek the truth; just drop your opinions."  Drop your theories; don't seek the truth.  Truth isn't something you search for.  If you stop being opinionated, you would know.  Something similar happens here.  If you drop your labels, you would know.  What do I mean by labels?  Every label you can conceive of except perhaps that of  human being.  I am a human being.  Fair enough; doesn't say very much.  But when you say, "I am successful," that's crazy.  Success is not part of the "I".  

Success is something that comes and goes; it could be here today and gone tomorrow.  That's not "I".  When you said, "I was a success," you were in error; you were plunged into darkness.  You identified yourself with success.  The same thing when you said, "I am a failure, a lawyer, a businessman." You know what's going to happen to you if you identify yourself with these things.  You're going to cling to them, you're going to be worried that they may fall apart, and that's where your suffering comes in.  That is what I meant earlier when I said to you, "If you're suffering, you're asleep." Do you want a sign that you're asleep? Here it is: You're suffering.  Suffering is a sign that you're out of touch with the truth.  Suffering is given to you that you might open your eyes to the truth, that you might understand that there's falsehood somewhere, just as physical pain is given to you so you will understand that there is disease or illness somewhere.  Suffering points out that there is falsehood somewhere.  

Suffering occurs when you clash with reality.  

When your illusions clash with reality when your falsehoods clash with the truth, then you have suffering.  

Otherwise there is no suffering.

Anthony De Mello

Contributed by: David

A Quote by Paul Michael Kaiser on reality, life, philosophy, religion, thoughts, words, ideas, meaning, and experience

I'm not entirely sure, but I'm pretty sure that you can be fairly sure that there is absolutely nothing you can be sure of.  If you take the time to think about it all, you start to realize that absolutely everything we experience might not even be real.  For instance, it is actually possible that our thoughts might not be entirely our own.  Our words have no absolute meaning.  In example, when someone mentions the color green it can be assumed that everyone would think of a green color but it can also be assumed that they are not all thinking of the same shade of green.  Any time you come to a conclusion about something you are probably wrong or at least not entirely correct.  Why else would there be so many varying philosophies, religions and social concepts and always more to come.  It can be assumed that we can't know everything about everything for sure.

Paul Kaiser

Source: I'm as sure as I can be that this quote came from my own mind through my finger tips and onto the world wide web.

Contributed by: ataraxia

A Quote by Kedar on man, god, appearance, reality, universe, nstp theory, uqv theory, and idealism

Man is an appearance, God is a reality.

Kedar Joshi

Source: Superultramodern Science and Philosophy

Contributed by: Kedar

A Quote by Norman Douglas on reality and right view

"How hard it is, sometimes, to trust the evidence of one's senses!  How reluctantly the mind consents to reality."

Norman Douglas

Contributed by: StellaByStarlight

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, mind, language, culture aristos, arete, excellence, reality, and intuition

Learning to free up or liberate one's mind to capture precisely the most essential points in anything is an athletic exercise in which, for the first time, we discover just what the actual cash-value of our "culture" truly is: has our culture contributed to making our minds more acute, clearer, more nimble and elastic? Has it given us a richer vocabulary of essences or concepts to facilitate our rational and moral digestion of issues? Or is our "culture" really no enzymatic culture at all, but merely a scheme of encumbrances, of intellectual and rational impediments that have been compounded out of endless Pavlovian conditionings, by which we came to accept fallacies and equivocations and deceptive connotations and lying rhetoric etc. as if they were the gospel truth? The premier value of reading the ancient thinkers lies in their aristocratic culture's determination to put an absolute premium on the development of acuity, directness, economy or essentiality of characterizations, etc. To be competent as an "aristos" (one committed absolutely to the cultivation of excellence or "arete" in its superlative degree), an individual was expected to keen his insights and judgment as much in the domain of intuition (being sensitive to the subtleties of the evidence, the realities) as in the domain of intellection (mustering the most apt tools of expression to characterize, conceptualize and evaluate these realities). Moderns have only the feeblest grasp of both of these processes.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, finite, infinite, salvation, order, preconditions, principles, phenomena, reality, character, spirit, and education

Nothing in the matter-of-fact or finite order of experience is directly or obviously grounded in actual authoritative principles; phenomena do not permit us to see through them to their infinite preconditions, and certainly not even to comprehend or conceptualize what kinds of things those preconditions may be. It is only through holistic and variably stressed principles that we can see the formation or architectonics of finite realities, in accordance with those lawful and ordering forces. There is no empirical path to principles, no psychological route to values or ultimate duties or essential character: hundreds of millions of human beings may despair of not having "salvation" who do not and cannot ever comprehend what the issue even is, i.e. the onslaught of the finite order that threatens to make our ambiguously finite/infinite spirit into just another finite particle within the finite world. We have to be always carrying out our self-education dialectically, with one eye on each domain, the finite and the infinite, each of which demands its own peculiar modus of intelligence and insight from us.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky on brain, dream, life, living, memory, pictures, and reality

In a morbid condition of the brain, dreams often have a singular actuality, vividness, and extraordinary semblance of reality.  At times monstrous images are created, but the setting and the whole picture are so truth-like and filled with details so delicate, so unexpectedly, but so artistically consistent, that the dreamer, were he an artist like Pushkin or Turgenev even, could never have invented them in the waking state.  Such sick dreams always remain long in the memory and make a powerful impression on the overwrought and deranged nervous system.

Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821 - 1881)

Contributed by: kelsey

A Quote by Janwillem van de Wetering on buddhism, zen, truth, and reality

To see what isn't true is easy. But to see what is true will take some doing.

Janwillem van de Wetering

Source: A Glimpse of Nothingness: Experiences in an American Zen Community

Contributed by: whoami

Syndicate content