questions

A Quote by Alfred Armand Montapert on control, faith, fate, people, philosophy, poets, power, questions, soul, and world

Question: Why are we Masters of our Fate, the captains of our souls? Because we have the power to control our thoughts, our attitudes. That is why many people live in the withering negative world. That is why many people live in the Positive Faith world. And you don't have to be a poet or a philosopher to know which is best.

Alfred Montapert (1906 -)

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A Quote by Albert Einstein on creativity, imagination, possibility, problems, questions, science, skill, and solution

The mere formulation of a problem is far more essential than its solution, which may be merely a matter of mathematical or experimental skills. To raise new questions, new possibilities, to regard old problems from a new angle requires creative imagination and marks real advances in science.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

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A Quote by Albert Einstein on certainty, needs, questions, and thought

We come now to the question: what is a priori certain or necessary, respectively in geometry (doctrine of space) or its foundations? Formerly we thought everything; nowadays we think nothing. Already the distance-concept is logically arbitrary; there need be no things that correspond to it, even approximately.

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Source: "Space-Time." Encyclopaedia Britannica, 14th ed.

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A Quote by Albert Camus on clarity, life, meaning, and questions

It was previously a question of finding out whether or not life had to have a meaning to be lived. It now becomes clear, on the contrary, that it will be lived all the better if it has no meaning.

Albert Camus (1913 - 1960)

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A Quote by Albert Camus on charm, clarity, and questions

You know what charm is: a way of getting the answer yes without having asked any clear question.

Albert Camus (1913 - 1960)

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A Quote by Alfred Jules Ayer on certainty, facts, logic, mathematics, principles, purity, purpose, questions, and virtue

A point which is not sufficiently brought out by Russell, if indeed it is recognized by him at all, is that every logical proposition is valid in its own right. Its validity does not depend upon its being incorporated in a system, and deduced from certain propositions which are taken as self-evident. The construction of systems of logic is useful as a means of discovering and certifying analytic propositions, but it is not in principle essential even for this purpose. For it is possible to conceive of a symbolism in which every analytic proposition could be seen to be analytic in virtue of its form alone. The fact that the validity of an analytic proposition in no way depends on its being deducible from other analytic propositions is our justification for disregarding the question whether the propositions of mathematics are reducible to propositions of formal logic, in the way that Russell supposed (1919, chap. 2). For even if it is the case that the definition of a cardinal number as a class of classes similar to a given class is circular, and it is not possible to reduce mathematical notions to purely logical notions, it will still remain true that the propositions of mathematics are analytic propositions. They will form a special class of analytic propositions, containing special terms, but they will be none the less analytic for that. For the criterion of an analytic proposition is that its validity should follow simply from the definition of the terms contained in it, and this condition is fulfilled by the propositions of pure mathematics.

A.J. Ayer

Source: Language Truth and Logic, Ayer, Ch.4, p.108

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A Quote by Alfred Jules Ayer on character, concern, consequences, facts, logic, philosophy, questions, and words

In other words, the propositions of philosophy are not factual, but linguistic in character - that is, they do not describe the behaviour of physical, or even mental, objects; they express definitions, or the formal consequences of definitions. Accordingly we may say that philosophy is a department of logic. For we will see that the characteristic mark of a purely logical enquiry, is that it is concerned with the formal consequences of our definitions and not with questions of empirical fact.

A.J. Ayer

Source: Language Truth and Logic, Ayer, Ch. 2, p.76

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A Quote by Agatha Christie on exercise, mathematics, men, questions, thinking, and work

"I think you're begging the question," said Haydock, "and I can see looming ahead one of those terrible exercises in probability where six men have white hats and six men have black hats and you have to work it out by mathematics how likely it is that the hats will get mixed up and in what proportion. If you start thinking about things like that, you would go round the bend. Let me assure you of that!"

Agatha Christie (1891 - 1976)

Source: The Mirror Crack'd. Toronto: Bantam Books, 1962.

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A Quote by Adlai Ewing Stevenson on politicians and questions

A politician is a statesman who approaches every question with an open mouth.

Adlai Stevenson (1900 - 1965)

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A Quote by Adam Lindsay Gordon on courage, goals, kindness, life, neighbors, questions, and trouble

Question not, but live and labour Till yon goal be won, Helping every feeble neighbor, Seeking help from none; Life is mostly froth and bubble, Two things stand like stone, Kindness in another's trouble, Courage in your own.

Adam Lindsay Gordon (1833 - 1870)

Source: Ye Wearie Wayfarer

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