purity

A Quote by Annie Dillard on apathy, books, colors, despair, difficulty, effort, experience, learning, meaning, people, purity, rest, vision, and world

I chanced on a wonderful book by Marius von Senden, called Space and Sight. . . . For the newly sighted, vision is pure sensation unencumbered by meaning: "The girl went through the experience that we all go through and forget, the moment we are born. She saw, but it did not mean anything but a lot of different kinds of brightness." . . . In general the newly sighted see the world as a dazzle of color-patches. They are pleased by the sensation of color, and learn quickly to name the colors, but the rest of seeing is tormentingly difficult. . . . The mental effort involved . . . proves overwhelming for many patients. It oppresses them to realize, if they ever do at all, the tremendous size of the world, which they had previously conceived of as something touchingly manageable. . . . A disheartening number of them refuse to use their new vision, continuing to go over objects with their tongues, and lapsing into apathy and despair. . . . On the other hand, many newly sighted people speak well of the world, and teach us how dull is our own vision.

Annie Dillard (nee Doak) (1945 -)

Source: Pilgrim at Tinker Creek

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anne Morrow Lindbergh on joy, knowledge, and purity

Forsythia is pure joy. There is not an ounce, not a glimmer of sadness or even knowledge in forsythia. Pure, undiluted, untouched joy.

Anne Lindbergh (1906 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anne Morrow Lindbergh on borrowing, desires, facts, grace, harmony, intention, language, life, peace, purity, saints, spirituality, and time

But I want first of all - in fact as an end to these other desires - to be at peace with myself. I want a singleness of eye, a purity of intention, a central core to my life that will enable me to carry out these obligations and activities as well as I can. I want in fact-to borrow from the language of the saints - to live 'in grace' as much of the time as possible. I am not using this term in a strictly theological sense. By grace I mean an inner harmony, essentially spiritual, which can be translated into outward harmony.

Anne Lindbergh (1906 -)

Source: Gift From the Sea

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anna Akhmatova on children, courage, purity, and songs

Courage: Great Russian word, fit for the songs of our children's children, pure on their tongues, and free.

Anna Akhmatova (1888 - 1966)

Source: Courage, composed 1942.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on mathematics, purity, and thought

The point of mathematics is that in it we have always got rid of the particular instance, and even of any particular sorts of entities. So that for example, no mathematical truths apply merely to fish, or merely to stones, or merely to colours. So long as you are dealing with pure mathematics, you are in the realm of complete and absolute abstraction. . . . Mathematics is thought moving in the sphere of complete abstraction from any particular instance of what it is talking about.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: Science and the Modern World

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on creation, mathematics, originality, purity, science, and spirit

The science of pure mathematics . . . may claim to be the most original creation of the human spirit.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: Science and the Modern World.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Hamilton on character, debate, democracy, direction, experience, fatherhood, good, government, honor, observation, people, politics, preparation, purity, and tyranny

The Founding Fathers were careful to distinguish representative republicanism from direct democracy. Alexander Hamilton, for example, endorsed the former but condemned the latter. . . .the records of the ratification conventions were not verbatim transcriptions. It has been observed, by an honorable gentleman, that a pure democracy, if it were practicable, would be the most perfect government. Experience has proved that no position in politics is more false than this. The ancient democracies, in which the people themselves deliberated, never possessed one feature of good government. Their very character was tyranny; their figure, deformity. When they assembled, the field of debate presented an ungovernable mob, not only incapable of deliberation, but prepared for every enormity.

Alexander Hamilton (c.1756 - 1804)

Source: at the New York convention for constitutional ratification, June 21, 1788

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aleister Crowley on lust, purity, and purpose

For pure will, unassuaged of purpose, delivered from the lust of result, is every way perfect.

Aleister Crowley (1875 - 1947)

Source: The Book of the Law, I:44 (1904)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert Einstein on abuse, deed, humanity, imagination, jesus, money, nobility, purity, selfishness, wealth, and world

I am absolutely convinced that no amount of wealth in the world can help humanity move forward, even in the hands of the most devoted worker. The example of great and pure individuals is the only thing that can lead us to noble thoughts and deeds. Money only appeals to selfishness and irresistably invites abuse. Can anyone imagine Moses, Jesus or Ghandi armed with the money-bags of Carnegie?

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955)

Source: On Wealth, 1954

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred Jules Ayer on certainty, facts, logic, mathematics, principles, purity, purpose, questions, and virtue

A point which is not sufficiently brought out by Russell, if indeed it is recognized by him at all, is that every logical proposition is valid in its own right. Its validity does not depend upon its being incorporated in a system, and deduced from certain propositions which are taken as self-evident. The construction of systems of logic is useful as a means of discovering and certifying analytic propositions, but it is not in principle essential even for this purpose. For it is possible to conceive of a symbolism in which every analytic proposition could be seen to be analytic in virtue of its form alone. The fact that the validity of an analytic proposition in no way depends on its being deducible from other analytic propositions is our justification for disregarding the question whether the propositions of mathematics are reducible to propositions of formal logic, in the way that Russell supposed (1919, chap. 2). For even if it is the case that the definition of a cardinal number as a class of classes similar to a given class is circular, and it is not possible to reduce mathematical notions to purely logical notions, it will still remain true that the propositions of mathematics are analytic propositions. They will form a special class of analytic propositions, containing special terms, but they will be none the less analytic for that. For the criterion of an analytic proposition is that its validity should follow simply from the definition of the terms contained in it, and this condition is fulfilled by the propositions of pure mathematics.

A.J. Ayer

Source: Language Truth and Logic, Ayer, Ch.4, p.108

Contributed by: Zaady

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