purity

A Quote by Godfrey H. Hardy on mathematics and purity

Pure mathematics is on the whole distinctly more useful than applied. For what is useful above all is technique, and mathematical technique is taught mainly through pure mathematics.

Godfrey H. Hardy (1877 - 1947)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Washington on acting, character, circumstances, death, decisions, doubt, fatherhood, fortune, good, imagination, integrity, inventions, judgment, justice, mind, nature, obstacles, prudence, purity, purpose, and words

Written about Washington after his death by another of the founding fathers, Thomas Jefferson: His mind was great and powerful . . . as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder. It was slow in operation, being little aided by invention or imagination, but sure in conclusion. . . . Perhaps the strongest feature in his character was prudence, never acting until every circumstance, every consideration, was maturely weighed; refraining if he saw doubt, but, when once decided, going through his purpose, whatever obstacles opposed. His integrity was the most pure, his justice the most inflexible I have ever known. . . . He was, indeed, in every sense of the words, a wise, a good and a great man . . . On the whole, his character was, in its mass, perfect . . . it may truly be said, that never did nature and fortune combine more perfectly to make a man great. . . .

George Washington (1732 - 1799)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Santayana on composers, problems, purity, senses, songs, and surprises

It is a pleasant surprise to him (the pure mathematician) and an added problem if he finds that the arts can use his calculations, or that the senses can verify them, much as if a composer found that sailors could heave better when singing his songs.

George Santayana (1863 - 1952)

Source: J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Orwell on appearance, language, lies, murder, politics, and purity

Political language is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give the appearance of solidity to pure wind.

George Orwell (1903 - 1950)

Source: Politics and the English Language, (1946)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Linley on life and purity

We gathered the wild-flowers. Yes, life there seem'd one pure delight; As thro' the field we rov'd. Yes, life there seem'd one pure delight.

George Linley (1798 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Linley on art, authority, authors, composers, existence, happiness, heart, hope, life, losing, memory, music, newspapers, past, privacy, purity, songs, time, tranquility, and wishes

Tho' lost to sight, to mem'ry dear Thou ever wilt remain; One only hope my heart can cheer,- The hope to meet again. Oh fondly on the past I dwell, And oft recall those hours When, wand'ring down the shady dell, We gathered the wild-flowers. Yes, life then seem'd one pure delight, Tho' now each spot looks drear; Yet tho' thy smile be lost to sight, To mem'ry thou art dear. Oft in the tranquil hour of night, When stars illume the sky, I gaze upon each orb of light, And wish that thou wert by. I think upon that happy time, That time so fondly lov'd, When last we heard the sweet bells chime, As thro' the fields we rov'd. Yes, life then seem'd one pure delight, Tho' now each spot looks drear; Yet tho' thy smile be lost to sight, To mem'ry thou art dear. This song-written and composed by Linley for Mr. Augustus Braham, and sung by him-is given entirely, as so much inquiry has been made for the source of "Though lost to Sight, to Memory dear." It is not known when the song was written,-probably about 1830. Another song, entitled "Though lost to Sight, to Memory dear," was published in London in 1880, purporting to have been "written by Ruthven Jenkyns in 1703." It is said to have been published in the "Magazine for Mariners." No such magazine, however, ever existed, and the composer of the music acknowledged, in a private letter, to have copied the song from an American newspaper. There is no other authority for the origin of this song, and the reputed author, Ruthven Jenkyns, was living, under the name of C--, in California in 1882.

George Linley (1798 - 1865)

Source: Song. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George H. Allen on inaction, mind, purity, water, and weather

Iron rusts from disuse, stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigors of the mind.

George H. Allen (1922 - 1990)

Source: see Leonardo da Vinci

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on cruelty, generosity, good, heaven, love, music, purity, soul, strength, and world

May I reach That purest heaven - be to other souls The cup of strength in some great agony; Enkindle generous ardor, feed pure love, Beget the smiles that have no cruelty. Be the sweet presence of a good diffused, And in the diffusion ever more intense! So shall I join the choir invisible Whose music is the gladness of the world.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Chapman on errors, innovation, and purity

Pure innovation is more gross than error.

George Chapman (1560 - 1634)

Source: King Henry, in "Bussy D'Ambois," act 1, sc. 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on idleness, mind, and purity

Purity of mind and idleness are incompatible.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Contributed by: Zaady

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