psychology

A Quote by Maxwell Maltz on action, belief, feeling, personality, personality, and psychology

Realizing that our actions, feelings and behaviour are the result of our own images and beliefs gives us the level that psychology has always needed for changing personality.

Maxwell Maltz

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jay W. Ingram on family, football, justice, life, psychology, science, scientists, tennis, thought, winning, wonder, and yielding

I once read that if the folds in the cerebral cortex were smoothed out it would cover a card table. That seemed quite unbelievable but it did make me wonder just how big the cortex would be if you ironed it out. I thought it might just about cover a family-sized pizza: not bad, but no card-table. I was astonished to realize that nobody seems to know the answer. A quick search yielded the following estimates for the smoothed out dimensions of the cerebral cortex of the human brain. An article in Bioscience in November 1987 by Julie Ann Miller claimed the cortex was a "quarter-metre square." That is napkin-sized, about ten inches by ten inches. Scientific American magazine in September 1992 upped the ante considerably with an estimate of 1 1/2 square metres; that's a square of brain forty inches on each side, getting close to the card-table estimate.' A psychologist at the University of Toronto figured it would cover the floor of his living room (I haven't seen his living room), but the prize winning estimate so far is from the British magazine New Scientist's poster of the brain published in 1993 which claimed that the cerebral cortex, if flattened out, would cover a tennis court. 'How can there be such disagreement?' How can so many experts not know how big the cortex is? I don't know, but I'm on the hunt for an expert who will say the cortex, when fully spread out, will cover a football field. A Canadian football field.

Jay W. Ingram

Source: The Burning House, Unlocking the Mysteries of the Brain Penguin Books, U.K., 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Keller on college, facts, people, psychology, questions, research, and students

A psychologist once asked a group of college students to jot down, in thirty seconds, the initials of the people they disliked. Some of the students taking the test could think of only one person. Others listed as many as fourteen. The interesting fact that came out of this bit of research was this: Those who disliked the largest number were themselves the most widely disliked. When we find ourselves continually disliking others, we ought to bring ourselves up short and ask ourselves the question: "What is wrong with me."

James Keller

Source: Three Minutes by James Keller, M. M., 1950

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A Quote by David Oman McKay on action, character, destruction, efficiency, evil, force, impulses, jealousy, opportunity, power, psychology, and yielding

He taught, and modern physiology and psychology confirm, that hate and jealousy and other evil passions destroy a man's physical vigor and efficiency. What a man continually thinks about determines his actions in times of opportunity and stress. A man's reaction to his appetites and impulses when they are roused gives the measure of that man's character. In these reactions are revealed the man's power to govern or his forced servility to yield.

David McKay (1873 - 1970)

Source: Conference Report, April 1967.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Daniel Dennett on abuse, anxiety, controversy, cosmology, culture, danger, defeat, ethics, force, ideas, improvement, politics, psychology, religion, revolution, struggle, thinking, traditions, and understanding

Much of the controversy and anxiety that has enveloped Darwin's idea ... can be understood as a series of campaigns in the struggle to contain Darwin's idea within some acceptably "safe" and merely partial revolution. Cede some or all of modern biology to Darwin, perhaps, but hold the line there! Keep Darwinian thinking out of cosmology, out of psychology, out of human culture, out of ethics, politics, and religion! In these campaigns, many battles have been won by the forces of containment: flawed applications of Darwin's idea have been exposed and discredited, beaten back by the champions of the pre-Darwinian tradition. But new waves of Darwinian thinking keep coming. They seem to be improved versions, not vulnerable to the refutations that defeated their predeccessors, but are they sound extensions of the unquestionably sound Darwinian core idea, or might they, too, be perversions of it, and even more virulent, more dangerous, than the abuses of Darwin already refuted?

Daniel Dennett (1942 -)

Source: Darwin's Dangerous Idea, London, Penguin, 1995, p 63

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ashleigh Brilliant on charm, college, diversity, good, insanity, literature, psychology, time, and work

Of Ashleigh Brilliant's work: "Endlessly quotable . . . they draw one by the charm of their diversity of texture and taste." - Eric Korn, The (London) Times Literary Supplement "Outstandingly good. I've been a fan for years." - Herb Caen, San Francisco Chronicle "I really like the things Ashleigh Brilliant thinks of. The only time he makes me mad is when he thinks of things before I do." - Charles M. Schulz, creator of Peanuts. "Wonderfully inspirational and insane messages." - Professor J. Katz, Dept. of Psychology, John Abbott College, Canada.

Ashleigh Brilliant (1933 -)

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A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on action, dogs, god, gold, nature, needs, psychology, reading, spirituality, and water

I think descriptions of nature should be very short and always be à propos. Commonplaces like "The setting sun, sinking into the waves of the darkening sea, cast its purple gold rays, etc," "Swallows, flitting over the surface of the water, twittered gaily" - eliminate such commonplaces. You have to choose small details in describing nature, grouping them in such a way that if you close your eyes after reading it you can picture the whole thing. For example, you'll get a picture of a moonlit night if you write that on the dam of the mill a piece of broken bottle flashed like a bright star and the black shadow of a dog or a wolf rolled by like a ball, etc. . . . In the realm of psychology you also need details. God preserve you from commonplaces. Best of all, shun all descriptions of the characters' spiritual state. You must try to have that state emerge clearly from their actions. Don't try for too many characters. The center of gravity should reside in two: he and she.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Source: To AP Chekhov, May 10, 1886

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A Quote by Allen E. Claxton, DD on community, crime, death, laziness, nations, and psychology

As individuals find crime to be a dead-end street, so communities and nations are subject to the same psychology. The moral side of public opinion is traditionally lazy, but there is an indefinable point at which it can be and is aroused.

Allen E. Claxton

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert Camus on action, life, personality, personality, psychology, and thinking

Psychology is action, not thinking about oneself. We continue to shape our personality all our life. To know oneself, one should assert oneself.

Albert Camus (1913 - 1960)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Albert Camus on action, psychology, and thinking

To know oneself, one should assert oneself. Psychology is action, not thinking about oneself.

Albert Camus (1913 - 1960)

Contributed by: Zaady

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