prudence

A Quote by Anatole France on fear, future, hope, prudence, and uncertainty

That man is prudent who neither hopes nor fears anything from the uncertain events of the future.

Anatole France (1844 - 1924)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on insults, prudence, violence, war, and words

REPARTEE, n. Prudent insult in retort. Practiced by gentlemen with a constitutional aversion to violence, but a strong disposition to offend. In a war of words, the tactics of the North American Indian.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on contempt, enemies, feeling, and prudence

CONTEMPT, n. The feeling of a prudent man for an enemy who is too formidable safely to be opposed.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on courage, growth, military, and prudence

PROJECTILE, n. The final arbiter in international disputes. With the growth of prudence in military affairs the projectile came more and more into favor, and is now held in high esteem by the most courageous.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on heart and prudence

"With ev'ry pleasing, ev'ry prudent part, Say, what can Chloe want?"-She wants a heart.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays, 1720-1735, Epistle II, To Mrs. M. Blount, 1735

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Akhnaton [Ikhnaton or Akhenaton] on guidance, heart, life, maxims, prudence, and words

Hear the words of prudence, give heed unto her counsels, and store them in thine heart; her maxims are universal, and all the virtues lean upon her; she is the guide and the mistress of human life.

Akhnaton (c.1375 - c.1353 BC)

Source: title taken by Amenhotep IV

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aesop on prudence

Affairs are easier of entrance than of exit; and it is but common prudence to see our way out before we venture in.

Aesop (620 - 560 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

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