prophets

A Quote by George Wharton James on books, church, companions, earth, education, fanaticism, genius, god, government, harmony, heart, life, literature, mind, parenthood, power, prejudice, principles, prophets, reason, superiority, and time

Who can explain Joseph Smith? What are "revelations from God"? What is their test? Is it not beyond reason that a lad, born of poor parents, devoid of any save the commonest education, too poor to buy books, should have accomplished what he did in less than 40 years, unless there was some great reason for it? Let any one, even a literary genius, after 40 years of life, try to write a companion volume to the Book of Mormon, and then almost daily for a number of years give out "revelations" that internally harmonize one with another, at the same time formulate a system of doctrine for a church, introduce many new principles, resuscitate extinct priesthoods and formulate a system of Church government which has no superior upon earth . . . to deny such a man a wonderful power over the human heart and intellect is absurd. Only fanatical prejudice can ignore it. However he may be accounted for by the reasoning mind, Joseph Smith, the Mormon Prophet was one of the wonders of his time.

George Wharton James

Source: James, George Wharton. UTAH. The Land of the Blossoming Valley. Boston, MA: Page Co., 1922.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Q. Cannon on blessings, confidence, correction, danger, direction, earth, faith, fear, feeling, gifts, god, guidance, habits, ideas, people, pleasure, power, privilege, prophets, purpose, rest, safety, serenity, thought, trust, virtue,

It has been my habit when I crossed the ocean-and I have been on both the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans many times-when a storm came up, or we appeared to be in danger from ice or any other cause-to watch the captain of the ship. I noted his demeanor, and I thought that by it I could form a correct idea of our danger. He knew, probably better than anyone else about our position and our danger, and therefore I took pleasure in watching him. And so it is in regard to the work of God. . . . It is my privilege to have all the gifts and blessings resting down upon me by virtue of my calling. If I am faithful thereto they will rest upon me. But it is not my privilege to guide the ship. . . . In times of danger, whatever my own feelings may be, . . . I always look . . . to the man whom God has placed to preside over his people. I watch him. I know that it is for him to direct the movements of the crew of the Ship Zion. It is for him to direct how she shall be steered, so far as human power is necessary for this purpose. When there are no tremors in him, when there are no indications of fear on his part, when he feels serene and confident, I know that I can do so with the utmost safety, and that this entire people can trust in that God who has placed a prophet, a seer, and a revelator to preside over his people upon the earth.

George Q. Cannon (1827 - 1901)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on errors and prophets

Prophecy is the most gratuitous form of error.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Eliot on mistakes and prophets

Among all forms of mistake, prophecy is the most gratuitous.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Middlemarch, bk. 1, ch. 10, 1872.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on age, beginning, belief, children, christ, christianity, cities, death, dogs, earth, enemies, experience, fighting, friendship, generations, god, gold, history, hunger, kindness, lies, men, motherhood, people, prophet

Never was a narrative more full of horrors, frenzies, unspeakable degradations, and overwhelming miseries than is the history of the siege of Jerusalem. Never was any prophecy more closely, more terribly, more overwhelmingly fulfilled than this of Christ. The men going about in the disguise of women with swords concealed under their gay robes; the rival outrages and infamies of John and Simon; the priests struck by darts from the upper court of the Temple, and falling slain by their own sacrifices; 'the blood of all sorts of dead carcases - priests, strangers, profane - standing in lakes in the holy courts'; the corpses themselves lying in piles and mounds on the very altar slopes; the fires feeding luxuriously on cedar-work overlaid with gold: friend and foe trampled to death on the gleaming mosaics in promiscuous carnage: priests, swollen with hunger, leaping madly into the devouring flames, till at last those flames had done their work, and what had been the Temple of Jerusalem, the beautiful and holy House of God, was a heap of ghastly ruin, where the burning embers were half-slaked in pools of gore. And did not all the righteous blood shed upon the earth since the days of Abel come upon that generation? Did not many of that generation survive to witness and feel the unutterable horrors which Josephus tells? - to see their fellows crucified in jest "some one way, and some another," till "room was wanting for the crosses, and crosses for the carcases?" - to experience the "deep silence" and the kind of deadly night which seized upon the city in the intervals of rage? - to see 600,000 dead bodies carried out of the gates? -- to see friends fighting madly for grass and nettles, and the refuse of the drains? to see the bloody zealots "gaping for want, and stumbling and staggering along like mad dogs?" - to hear the horrid tale of the miserable mother who, in the pangs of famine, had devoured her own child? - to be sold for slaves in such multitudes that at last none would buy them? - to see the streets running with blood, and the "fire of burning houses quenched in the blood of their defenders?" - to have their young sons sold in hundreds, or exposed in the amphitheatres to the sword of the gladiator or the fury of the lion, until at last, "since the people were now slain, the Holy House burnt down, and the city in flames, there was nothing farther left for the enemy to do?" In that awful siege it is believed that there perished 1,100,000 men, besides the 97.000 who were carried captive, and most of whom perished subsequently in the arena or the mine; and it was an awful thing to feel, as some of the survivors and eyewitnesses - and they not Christians - did feel, that the city had deserved its overthrow by producing a generation of men who were the causes of its misfortunes;' and that "neither did any other city ever suffer such miseries, nor did any age ever breed a generation more fruitful in wickedness than this was, since the beginning of the world."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: The Life of Christ, pp. 572-73, quoted by Bruce R. McConkie, The Mortal Messiah, Vol.3, p.433-434.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Eric Hoffer on change, common sense, existence, familiarity, names, people, possibility, practicality, and prophets

The well adjusted make poor prophets. A pleasant existence blinds us to the possibilities of drastic change. We cling to what we call our common sense, our practical point of view. Actually, these are names for an all-absorbing familiarity with things as they are. . . . Thus it happens that when the times become unhinged, it is the practical people who are caught unaware . . . still clinging to things that no longer exist.

Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Eric Hoffer on lies, possessions, power, and prophets

Those in possession of absolute power can not only prophesy and make their prophecies come true, but they can also lie and make their lies come true.

Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emil Brunner on belief, buddhism, character, christ, christianity, communication, direction, divinity, faith, god, history, indifference, islam, jesus, life, personality, personality, philosophy, practice, prophets, questions, religion, soul,

For the Platonic or Aristotelian philosophy, it is of no importance whether Plato or Aristotle ever lived. For the mystical practice of an Indian, Persian, Chinese, or Neo-Platonic mystic it is a matter of indifference whether Rama, Buddha, Laotse, or Porphyrius are myths or not. The mystic has no personal relation to them. It is not here a question of somebody telling me the truth which of myself I cannot find, but of my finding an access to the depths of the world in the depths of my soul. And everywhere the tendency is to eliminate personality. Even where religion does not have this mystical character, it has no relation to an historical person, who communicates himself to me. That is the characteristic essence of the Christian faith alone. Even where a prophet plays the role of a mediator of divine truth, as for example in Islam, the religious act is not directed toward him but toward his teaching or message. But the Christian does not believe in the teachings of Jesus - which would not be Christian faith, but general religion - he believes in Christ Himself as being the Word of God.

Emil Brunner (1889 - 1966)

Source: The Word and the World

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elbert Green Hubbard on observation and prophets

Prophecy - To observe that which has passed, and guess it will happen again.

Elbert Hubbard (1856 - 1915)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dallin H. Oaks on attitude, beginning, children, earth, eternity, god, identity, individuality, knowledge, practice, prophets, purpose, and spirit

Our attitude toward abortion . . . is fixed by our knowledge that according to an eternal plan all of the spirit children of God must come to this earth for a glorious purpose, and that individual identity began long before conception and will continue for all the eternities to come. We rely on the prophets of God who have told us that while there may be 'rare' exceptions, 'the practice of elective abortion is fundamentally contrary to the Lord's injunction, 'Thou shalt not . . . kill, nor do anything like unto it'

Dallin H. Oaks (1932 -)

Source: Ensign, November 1993, © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

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