proof

A Quote by Dr. Joyce Brothers on love, proof, and trust

The best proof of love is trust.

Dr. Joyce Brothers (1928 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dante Alighieri on angels, day, fatherhood, forgiveness, god, grace, heaven, humility, learning, love, men, merit, peace, power, praise, prayer, pride, proof, and strength

They find seven cornices on which penitent and redeemed sinners are cleansed by the grace of God. On the first cornice, that of Pride, the proud are learning humility: Our Father, dwelling in the Heavens, nowise As circumscribed, but as the things above, Thy first effects, are dearer in Thine eyes, Hallowed Thy name be and the Power thereof, By every creature, as right meet it is We praise the tender effluence of Thy love. Let come to us, let come Thy kingdom's peace; If it come not, we've no power of our own To come to it, for all our subtleties. Like as with glad Hosannas at Thy throne Thine angels offer up their wills alway, So let men offer theirs, that Thine be done. Our daily manna give to us this day, Without which he that through this desert wild Toils most to speed goes backward on his way. As we, with all our debtors reconciled, Forgive, do thou forgive us, nor regard Our merits, but upon our sins look mild. Put not our strength, too easily ensnared And overcome, to proof with the old foe; But save us from him, for he tries it hard. This last prayer is not made for us-we know Dear Lord, that it is needless-but for those Who still remain behind us we pray so.

Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321)

Source: Inferno

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Proteus Steinmetz on mathematics, men, proof, relatives, and science

Mathematics is the most exact science, and its conclusions are capable of absolute proof. But this is so only because mathematics does not attempt to draw absolute conclusions. All mathematical truths are relative, conditional. In E. T. Bell Men of Mathematics, New York: Simona and Schuster, 1937.

Charles Proteus Steinmetz (1865 - 1923)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Percy Snow on atoms, authority, awards, clarity, direction, doubt, existence, good, history, laws, listening, mathematics, physics, proof, purity, satisfaction, scientists, simplicity, style, theory, thought, time, unity, and work

Einstein, twenty-six years old, only three years away from crude privation, still a patent examiner, published in the Annalen der Physik in 1905 five papers on entirely different subjects. Three of them were among the greatest in the history of physics. One, very simple, gave the quantum explanation of the photoelectric effect-it was this work for which, sixteen years later he was awarded the Nobel prize. Another dealt with the phenomenon of Brownian motion, the apparently erratic movement of tiny particles suspended in a liquid: Einstein showed that these movements satisfied a clear statistical law. This was like a conjuring trick, easy when explained: before it, decent scientists could still doubt the concrete existence of atoms and molecules: this paper was as near direct proof of their concreteness as a theoretician could give. The third paper was the special theory of relativity, which quietly amalgamated space, time and matter into one fundamental unity. This last paper contains no references and quotes no authority. All of them are written in a style unlike any other theoretical physicist's. They contain very little mathematics. There is a good deal of verbal commentary. The conclusions, the bizarre conclusions, emerge as though with the greatest of ease: the reasoning is unbreakable. It looks as though he had reached the conclusions by pure thought, unaided, without listening to the opinions of others. To a surprisingly large extent, that is precisely what he had done. It is pretty safe to say that, so long as physics lasts, no one will again hack out three major breakthroughs in one year.

Charles Percy Snow (1905 - 1980)

Source: C.P. Snow, Variety of Men, Penguin Books, Harmondsworth, U.K. 1969, pp 85-86.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Peters on proof and writing

Bureaucrats write memoranda both because they appear to be busy when they are writing and because the memos, once written, immediately become proof that they were busy.

Charles Peters

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Birgitta of Sweden on blessings, body, christ, death, desires, eternity, glory, hope, innocence, jesus, life, love, men, mercy, paradise, passion, proof, and soul

Blessed are you, my Lord Jesus Christ. Fearing your passion and death, you poured forth blood from your innocent body like sweat, and still you accomplished your redemption as you desired and gave us the clearest proof of your love for all men. Eternal blessing be yours, my Lord Jesus Christ, because in your last agony you held out to sinners the hope of pardon, when in your mercy you promised the glory of paradise to the penitent thief. Blessed may you be, my Lord Jesus Christ. You redeemed our souls with your precious blood and most holy death, and in your mercy you led them from exile back to eternal life.

Birgitta of Sweden (1303 - 1373)

Source: Revelations, which are largely meditations on the Passion of Our Lord.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on gold and proof

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The proof of gold is fire. . . .

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on god, life, men, proof, time, and truth

I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live the more convincing proof I see of this truth-that God governs the affairs of men.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on achievement, happiness, integrity, life, loyalty, pain, proof, and purpose

Achievement of your happiness is the only moral purpose of your life, and that happiness -not pain or mindless self-indulgence - is the proof of your moral integrity, since it is the proof and the result of your loyalty to the achievement of your values.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: Atlas Shrugged, 1957

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on incompetence, jobs, machines, management, and proof

If there is any one proof of a man's incompetence, it is the stagnant mentality of a worker who, doing some small routine job in a vast undertaking, does not care to look beyond the lever of a machine, does not choose to know how the machine got there or what makes his job possible, and proclaims that the management of the undertaking is parasitical and unnecessary.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Contributed by: Zaady

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