proof

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on culture and proof

It is proof of high culture to say the greatest matters in the simplest way.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on fame, people, and proof

Fame is proof that the people are gullible.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Rainer Maria Rilke on difficulty, love, preparation, proof, and work

For one human being to love another: that is perhaps the most difficult of our tasks; the ultimate, the last test and proof, the work for which all other work is but preparation.

Rainer Maria Rilke (1875 - 1926)

Source: Letters to a Young Poet (Vintage), Pages: 68

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A Quote by Pierre de Fermat on impossibility, power, and proof

In the margin of his copy of Diophantus' Arithmetica, Fermat wrote: To divide a cube into two other cubes, a fourth power or in general any power whatever into two powers of the same denomination above the second is impossible, and I have assuredly found an admirable proof of this, but the margin is too narrow to contain it.

Pierre de Fermat (1601 - 1665)

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A Quote by Paul R. Halmos on justice, proof, and questions

Don't just read it; fight it! Ask your own questions, look for your own examples, discover your own proofs. Is the hypothesis necessary? Is the converse true? What happens in the classical special case? What about the degenerate cases? Where does the proof use the hypothesis?

Paul R. Halmos

Source: I Want to be a Mathematician, Washington: MAA Spectrum, 1985.

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A Quote by Cal Thomas on acceptance, america, audiences, babies, blindness, boldness, children, concern, country, criticism, death, decisions, dignity, generosity, good, heart, hunger, inclusion, life, love, motherhood, murder, nations, nobility, peace,

Mother Teresa Has Anti-Abortion Answer At a National Prayer Breakfast in Washington Feb. 3, Mother Teresa of Calcutta delivered the most startling and bold proclamation of truth to power I have heard in my more than 30 professional years in Washington. Before an audience of 3,000 - that included the president and his wife, the vice president and his wife and congressional leaders, among others - the 83-year old nun, who is physically frail but spiritually and rhetorically powerful, delivered an address that cut to the heart of the social ills afflicting America. She said that America, once known for generosity to the world, has become selfish. And she said that the greatest proof of that selfishness is abortion. Tying abortion to growing violence and murder in the streets, she said, "If we accept that a mother can kill even her own child, how can we tell other people not to kill each other? . . . Any country that accepts abortion is not teaching its people to love, but to use any violence to get what they want." At that line, most of those in attendance erupted in a standing ovation, something that rarely occurs at these sedate events. At that moment, President Clinton quickly reached for his water glass, and Mrs. Clinton and Vice President and Mrs. Gore stared without expression at Mother Teresa. They did not applaud. It was clearly an uncomfortable moment on the dais. She then delivered the knockout punch: "Many people are very, very concerned with children in India, with the children of Africa where quite a few die of hunger, and so on. Many people are also concerned about all the violence in this great country of the United States. "These concerns are very good. But often these same people are not concerned with the millions who are being killed by the deliberate decision of their own mothers. And this is what is the greatest destroyer of peace today - abortion, which brings people to such blindness." What? Abortion destroys peace and causes blindness toward the sick, the hungry and the naked? Abortion leads to wars between nations? Of course it does, if life is regarded so lightly and its disposal becomes so trivial, so clinical and so easy. Why should people or nations regard human life as noble or dignified if abortion flourishes? Why agonize about indiscriminate death in Bosnia when babies are being killed far more efficiently and out of the sight of television cameras? Mother Teresa delivered her address without rhetorical flourishes. She never raised her voice or pounded the lectern. Her power was in her words and the selfless life she has led. Even President Clinton, in his remarks that followed, acknowledged she was beyond criticism because of the life she has lived in service to others. At the end, she pleaded for pregnant women who don't want their children to give them to her: "I am willing to accept any child who would be aborted and to give that child to a married couple who will love the child and be loved by the child." She said she has placed over 3,000 children in adoptive homes from her Calcutta headquarters alone. She has answered the question, "Who will care for all of these babies if abortion is again outlawed?" Now the question is whether a woman contemplating abortion wishes to be selfish or selfless, to take life or to give life.

Cal Thomas

Source: Los Angeles Times Syndicate, Salt Lake Tribune, Feb. 14, 1994

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A Quote by Morris Kline on doubt and proof

A proof tells us where to concentrate our doubts.

Morris Kline

Source: N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC:Rome Press Inc., 1988.

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A Quote by Mike Huybensz on past and proof

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Those who misremember the past are pleased to repeat it as "proof."

Mike Huybensz

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A Quote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra on judgment and proof

The proof of the pudding is in the eating. By a small sample we may judge of the whole piece.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547 - 1616)

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A Quote by Michel Eyquem de Montaigne on confidence, good, goodness, and proof

Confidence in the goodness of another is good proof of one's own goodness.

Michel Montaigne (1533 - 1592)

Source: Essais

Contributed by: Zaady

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