projection

A Quote by R. Collier on unclarified mind, mind, faults, projection, and opponents

"An unclarified mind represses its own faults and then projects them on all opponents."

R. Collier

Source: Amazing Secrets of the Masters of the Far East, p.209

Contributed by: bajarbattu

A Quote by tara on womenswisdom, fear, courage, shadow, projection, and tara


when you face the demons
in the deep dark forest
they tend to become
your friends

tara

Contributed by: tara

A Quote by tara on perception, projection, nlp, and tara


all perception
is projection
- a nlp-ism

tara

Contributed by: tara

A Quote by julie sarah powell on divine, experience, freedom, projection, self, essence, no self, self realisation, bernadette roberts, and ramana maharshi

In essence all experiences can only be an unconscious projection from the Self or mindbody package, of the Divine. Not the Divine itself, simply triggered by touching on the Divine.


That which is through all experience cannot be affected by anything. It is only that, which is left when experience is gone.


Now there is no experiencer, nor any experience to be experienced.


Freedom itself.

julie sarah powell

Source: http://www.beyondselfnow.com/diary.html

Contributed by: jai

A Quote by Byron Katie on womenswisdom, love, mind, and projection

As long as we're at war with our own minds, we are at war with the world and with the whole human race. Because as long as we want to get rid of our thoughts, anyone that we meet is likely to become an enemy. There is only one mind, and people are going to tell us what we haven't dealt with yet in their own thinking. You're fat. You're stupid. You're not good enough.'

If you are an enemy to your own mind, other people have to become enemies too,  sooner or later. Until you understand, until you can love the thoughts that appear  in your mind, then you can love the rest of us. You work with the projector  -the mind - not the projected world.  I can't really love you until I question the mind that thinks it sees you outside itself . . .

Byron Katie

Contributed by: tara

A Quote by Isha De Lubicz on idol, idolatry, religion, god, and projection

Many are those who project their imaginings outside themselves and create gods “in their own image and likeness.”  The powers they would adore are those that can grant them all the boons they yearn for in this world and the next.  They are answered by Christ’s word:  “Ye know not what ye ask” (Mark 10:38).

            Their wish is for an idol to protect and favor them, or else for a divine being who can be loved possessively.  But the paradises, like gods, are made by men according to their desires, and their misfortune will be that they will often find what they have imagined.  But what we can imagine is no part of the inexpressible Divine.     

Isha De Lubicz

Source: Opening of the Way: A Practical Guide to the Wisdom of Ancient Egypt, Pages: 78

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Mevlana Jelalu'ddin Rumi on faults and projection

Many of the faults you see in others, dear reader,
are your own nature reflected in them.

Mevlana Rumi (1207 - 1273)

Source: The Rumi Collection: An Anthology of Translations of Mevlana Jalaluddin Rumi (Shambhala Classics), Pages: 18

Contributed by: Jessica

A Quote by Daniel Pinchbeck on daniel pinchbeck, 2012, job, yaweh, jung, shadow, antimony, book of job, old testament, bible, and projection

In the book of Job written several centuries before the New Testament, Yaweh subject his “faithful servant,” Job,  to a harrowing series of tests, after excepting a wager from Satan that Job’s faith can be broken.  “Job is no more the outward occasion for an inward process of dialectic in God,” wrote Jung.  Like a scientist performing some cruel experiment on bacilli in a test tube, Yaweh kills Job’s family, removes his land, riddles him with disease, and inflicts every imaginable form of ruin upon him.  Job, however, remains steadfast.  At the same time, he is determined to understand the reason for his plight.  According to Jung, Job is the first man to comprehend the split inside Yaweh – that the God-image is an antimony, comprising both the dark god of cruelty and the benevolent deity of love and justice;  “in light of this realization his knowledge attains a divine numinosity.”  Confronted by archetypal injustice, Job insists on equalizing compassion, and eventually receives it, as his status in the world is restored.

Despite his overpowering might, the creator fears the judgment of his creature.  “Yaweh projects onto Job a skeptic’s face which is hateful to him because it is his own, and which gazes at him with an uncanny and critical eye,” Jung noted.  From the perspective of the God-image, Job had attained a higher state of knowledge than Yaweh through his trvails, and this required a compensatory sacrifice, enacted, a few hundred years later, through the incarnation of Christ.

Jung realized that God intended to fully incarnate in the collective body of humanity, and that this time was quickly approaching.  From his psychoanalytic and personal work and theoretical musings, he proposed that the Christian Trinity of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost was unfolding into a “quaternity,” adding a fourth element that had been suppressed from the Western psyche.  “The enigma of squaring the circle” was one representation of this quaternity, “an age-old and presumably pre-historic symbol, always associated with the idea of a world-creating deity.”  This aspect of divinity, now returning and requiring assimilation into consciousness, was the Devil, who had been dissociated from the Western psyche at the beginning of the Judeo-Christian aeon.  Along with the Devil, the fourth element also represented natural wisdom, personified by the Gnosticc deity Sophia, long exiled and excised from the canonical texts.

Since the creator is an antimony, a totality of inner opposites, his creatures reflect this schism.  To descend into humanity, God must choose “the creaturely man filled with darkness – the natural man who is tainted with original sin,” Jung wrote.  “The guilty man is eminently suitable and is therefore chosen to become the vessel for the continuing incarnation, not the guiltless one who holds aloof from the world, and refuses to pay his tribute to life, for in him the dark God would find no room.”  The uniting of opposites, the reconciliation of dark and light contained in the God-image, can only take place within the consciously realized “guilty man,” not the sanctimonious, ascetic, or self-righteous one – anyone who denies their shadow will only project it in some new form.

Daniel Pinchbeck

Source: 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl, Pages: 345

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Daniel Pinchbeck on daniel pinchbeck, 2012, visitors, aliens, chogyal namkai norbu, duality, grays, shadow, projection, and assimilation

The visitors seem to be entities that sustain themselves from the negative emotions such as fear and anxiety, emanated by the human nervous system and energy body

Chogyal Namkai Norbu writes in Dzogchen: The Self Perfected State:
Duality is the real root of our suffering and all our conflicts.  All our concepts and beliefs, no matter how profound they may seem, are like nets which trap us in dualism.  When we discover our limitations we have to try and overcome them, untying ourselves from whatever type of religious, political, or social conviction may condition us.  We have to abandon such concepts as “enlightenment,” “the nature of the mind,” and so on, until we no longer neglect to integrate our knowledge with our actual existence.

Connected to our technological development, the Grays embody a malignant, supersensible element lurking beneath our fascination with mechanization, revealing the irrational basis of our constricted rationality.  They also have lessons to teach us.  As the critic Lewis Mumford noted, “Our capacity to go beyond the machine rests on our power to assimilate the machine.  Until we have absorbed the lessons of objectivity, impersonality, neutrality, the lessons of the mechanical realm, we cannot go further in our development toward the more richly organic, the more profoundly human.”  Like transhumanist zombies, the Grays embody the reductive perspective that sees everything – matter, genes, human souls – as resources to be used for purposes of control and domination.  In this way, the visitors serve as a warning, as well as an inoculation against a nightmarish fate we can recognize, and reject, in the time that remains to us.

Daniel Pinchbeck

Source: 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl, Pages: 142 - 3

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Baba Ram Dass on evolution and projection

What you meet in another being is the projection of your own level of evolution.

Ram Dass

Contributed by: myster.E

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