progress

A Quote by Ella Wheeler Wilcox on discontent, progress, and world

And from the discontent of man The world's best progress springs.

Ella Wilcox (1850 - 1919)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elihu Root on action, blindness, brothers, charity, control, country, desires, duty, feeling, government, happiness, individuality, judgment, life, love, nobility, people, popularity, prejudice, principles, progress, prosperity, reason, self-c

True love of country is not mere blind partisanship. It is regard for the people of one's country and all of them; it is a feeling of fellowship and brotherhood for all of them; it is a desire for the prosperity and happiness of all of them; it is kindly and considerate judgment toward all of them. The first duty of popular self-government is individual self-control. The essential condition of true progress is that it shall be based upon grounds of reason, and not prejudice. Lincoln's noble sentiment of charity for all and malice toward none was not a specific for the Civil War, but is a living principle of action.

Elihu Root (1845 - 1937)

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A Quote by Edward O. Sisson on character, cooperation, desires, direction, education, eternity, experience, harmony, impulses, individuality, life, principles, progress, purpose, soul, and strength

NATIVE vigor of impulses and desires conserved by education and experience, the establishment of inner harmony and cooperation among the powers and capacities of the soul, the formation of a life purpose, and the direction of the individual life in accordance with the eternal principles of right that underlie human progress, - these are the elements of both strength and righteousness in human character.

Edward O. Sisson

Source: The Essentials of Character, The Macmillan Company, 1915

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A Quote by Edward Kasner on danger, home, logic, mathematics, order, progress, seriousness, and suffering

When the mathematician says that such and such a proposition is true of one thing, it may be interesting, and it is surely safe. But when he tries to extend his proposition to everything, though it is much more interesting, it is also much more dangerous. In the transition from one to all, from the specific to the general, mathematics has made its greatest progress, and suffered its most serious setbacks, of which the logical paradoxes constitute the most important part. For, if mathematics is to advance securely and confidently, it must first set its affairs in order at home.

Edward Kasner

Source: E. Kasner and J. Newman, Mathematics and the Imagination, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1940.

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A Quote by Earl O. Shreve on agriculture, boldness, discovery, effort, future, government, labor, lies, miracles, optimism, progress, promises, science, technology, war, welfare, and world

Despite world unrest, the frontiers of the future lie invitingly before us. They stretch to fabulous horizons of scientific and technological discovery-all holding promise of contribution to the national welfare. But these frontiers of tomorrow call for bold enterprise-for optimism, for the united effort of industry, labor, agriculture and government. In the mounting miracles of science, in the rapid advances of technology, lie the foundations for almost countless new industries and for far swifter social progress. This promise of progress is daily taking more definite shape and clearer form, as it shakes free of the post-war mists.

Earl O. Shreve

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A Quote by E. Parmalee Prentice on dependence, earth, facts, history, inclusion, labor, progress, time, and understanding

If anyone wants to understand the course of man on earth, he must consider the fact of the long pause, three million years on the level of savagery, ten thousand years on the level of dependence on the fruits of hand labor, and a hundred or a hundred and fifty years of sudden sharp rise. One hundred or 150 years is the time included in what we call progress in man's history.

E. Parmalee Prentice

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A Quote by Dwan Jacobsen Young on christ, darkness, despair, enemies, failure, hope, jesus, language, progress, soul, and world

Hopelessness may be the saddest word in our language. Despair is the enemy of our souls. It can paralyze us, halt our progress, and cause us to lose our way. But hope awakens us like a light shining in the darkness. We can endure all things when our hope is centered in one who will never fail us-our Savior, Jesus Christ, who is the light of the world.

Dwan Jacobsen Young

Source: Ensign, November 1986, p. 86., © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission..

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A Quote by Dr. Edmund Ezra Day on achievement, certainty, commitment, democracy, falsehood, fear, freedom, honesty, hope, injustice, justice, leadership, life, progress, tranquility, truth, violence, and world

There are certain fundamental requisites for wise and resolute democratic leadership. It must build on hope, not on fear; on honesty, not on falsehood; on justice, not on injustice; on public tranquility, not on violence; on freedom, not on enslavement. It must weave a social fabric in which the most important strands are a devotion to truth and a commitment to righteousness. These are essential ingredients of the American way of life. They are the necessary conditions for the achievement of freedom and human progress the world over.

Dr. Edmund Ezra Day

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A Quote by Dr. Dale E. Turner on belief, faults, limitations, progress, and truth

The greatest of all faults is to be conscious of none. Recognizing our limitations and imperfections is the first requisite of progress. Those who believe they have "arrived" believe they have nowhere to go. Some not only have closed their minds to new truth, but they sit on the lid.

Dr. Dale E. Turner

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A Quote by Dietrich Bonhoeffer on apathy, attitude, beginning, dignity, discovery, fidelity, god, good, meditation, patience, poverty, progress, spirituality, and vanity

Above all, it is not necessary that we should have any unexpected, extraordinary experiences in meditation. This can happen, but if it does not, it is not a sign that the meditation period has been useless. Not only at the beginning, but repeatedly, there will be times when we feel a great spiritual dryness and apathy, an aversion, even an inability to meditate. We dare not be balked by such experiences. Above all, we must not allow them to keep us from adhering to our meditation period with great patience and fidelity. It is, therefore, not good for us to take too seriously the many untoward experiences we have with ourselves in meditation. It is here that our old vanity and our illicit claims upon God may creep in by a pious detour, as if it were our right to have nothing but elevating and fruitful experiences, and as if the discovery of our own inner poverty were quite beneath our dignity. With that attitude, we shall make no progress.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer (1906 - 1945)

Source: Life Together

Contributed by: Zaady

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