privacy

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on honor, life, modesty, and privacy

NOMINEE, n. A modest gentleman shrinking from the distinction of private life and diligently seeking the honorable obscurity of public office.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on politics, privacy, and progress

DEGRADATION, n. One of the stages of moral and social progress from private station to political preferment.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on hope, military, and privacy

PRIVATE, n. A military gentleman with a field-marshal's baton in his knapsack and an impediment in his hope.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on action, clarity, faith, friendship, honor, losing, privacy, promises, sincerity, soul, and truth

Statesman, yet friend to truth! of soul sincere, In action faithful, and in honour clear; Who broke no promise, serv'd no private end, Who gain'd no title, and who lost no friend.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Epistle to Mr. Addison. Line 67.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on god, nature, privacy, and slavery

Slave to no sect, who takes no private road, But looks through Nature up to Nature's God.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man, epistle iv. line 331.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on literature, memory, and privacy

Every man's memory is his private literature.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adam Smith on economics, people, privacy, and society

It is the highest impertinence and presumption, therefore, in kings and ministers to pretend to watch over the economy of private people, and to restrain their expense. They are themselves, always, and without any exception, the greatest spendthrifts in the society.

Adam Smith

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, belief, cities, conversation, elections, freedom, god, injustice, prayer, presidency, privacy, slavery, speech, words, and work

I know there is a God, and that He hates injustice and slavery. I see the storm coming, and I know that His hand is in it. If he has a place and work for me - and I think He has - I believe I am ready. This comment was made in a private conversation with Newton Bateman, superintendent of public instruction for the state of Illinois, a few days before the election of 1860. During the election of 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy used the same words in a speech to the United Steelworkers of America convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, September 19, 1960. - Freedom of Communications, final report of the Committee on Commerce, United States Senate, part 1, p. 286 (1961). Senate Report. 87-994. As president, he used a variation of these words at the 10th annual presidential prayer breakfast, March 1, 1962. - Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: John F Kennedy, 1962, p. 176.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Attributed in. — Joseph Gilbert Holland, The Life of Abraham Lincoln,1886, Unverified.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on anecdotes, art, beginning, character, communication, freedom, gold, government, life, people, presidency, privacy, silence, and worth

Gentlemen, suppose all the property you were worth was in gold, and you had put it in the hands of Blondin to carry across the Niagara River on a rope, would you shake the cable, or keep shouting out to him - "Blondin, stand up a little straighter - Blondin, stoop a little more - go a little faster - lean a little more to the north - lean a little more to the south?" No, you would hold your breath as well as your tongue, and keep your hands off until he was safe over. The Government are carrying an immense weight. Untold treasures are in their hands. They are doing the very best they can. Don't badger them. Keep silence, and we'll get you safe across. -Francis B. Carpenter, "Anecdotes and Reminiscences of President Lincoln" in Henry Jarvis Raymond, The Life and Public Services of Abraham Lincoln..., p. 752 (1865). Carpenter, a portrait artist, lived in the White House for six months beginning February 1864, to paint the president and the entire Cabinet. His relations with the president became of an "intimate character," and he was permitted "the freedom of his private office at almost all hours,...privileged to see and know more of his daily life" than most people. He states that he "endeavored to embrace only those [anecdotes] which bear the marks of authenticity. Many....I myself heard the President relate; others were communicated to me by persons who either heard or took part in them" (p. 725). Blondin (real name Jean Francois Gravelet) was a French tightrope walker who crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope in 1855, 1859, and 1860.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: reply to critics 1864, Francis B. Carpenter, in H J Raymond, Life & Public Service of A. Lincoln

Contributed by: Zaady

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