privacy

A Quote by Bruce Whiteman on privacy, love, self, and future

There is a catalogue of private acts which you harbour inviolable and do not speak about. Hold it whole in your head and consider what everyone you know is doing right now. Small isolated things which your imagining rescues from the silence of privacy. A social encyclopedia of the present tense. Somewhere the personality slips its leash and disappears over the back fence leaving nothing ferocious to fight off the throng of details that rushes into your brain. You become a society, a public resource, a random dictionary of ephemera. And love is the force which allows you to speak in the midst of all this negative capability and which keeps you away from madness and inside a body with a future.

Bruce Whiteman

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Janov Pelorat on civilization, advance, exercise, and privacy

It seems to me, Golan, that the advance of civilization is nothing but an exercise in the limiting of privacy.

Janov Pelorat

Source: Asimov's Foundation's Edge

Contributed by: bajarbattu

A Quote by Earon on god, religion, faith, privacy, and modesty

God is an imaginary friend we really don't need to tell others about.

Earon Davis

Source: Earon Davis

Contributed by: Earon

A Quote by Andrew A. ‘Andy' Rooney on privacy, needs, and fulfillment

We're all torn between the desire for privacy and the fear of lonliness.  We need each other and we need to get away from each other.  We need proximity and distance, conversation and silence.  We almost always get more of each than we want at any one time.

Andy Rooney (1919 -)

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Thomas Eugene (Tom) Robbins on privacy and solitude

Sometimes those things that attract the most attention to us are the things which afford us the greatest privacy

Tom Robbins (1936 -)

Source: Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Pages: 213

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on belief, genius, heart, men, privacy, and thought

To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men-that is genius.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen R. Covey on character, improvement, motives, personality, personality, privacy, promises, and relationships

The ''Inside-Out'' approach to personal and interpersonal effectiveness means to start first with self; even more fundamentally, to start with the most inside part of self -- with your paradigms, your character, and your motives. The inside-out approach says that private victories precede public victories, that making and keeping promises to ourselves recedes making and keeping promises to others. It says it is futile to put personality ahead of character, to try to improve relationships with others before improving ourselves.

Stephen Covey (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen R. Covey on plants and privacy

Private victories precede public victories. You can't invert that process any more than you can harvest a crop before you plant it.

Stephen Covey (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, deed, doubt, friendship, good, honor, love, men, power, privacy, reason, speech, wit, words, and worth

Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him: For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know; Show you sweet Caesar's wounds, poor poor dumb mouths, And bid them speak for me: but were I Brutus, And Brutus Antony, there were an Antony Would ruffle up your spirits and put a tongue In every wound of Caesar that should move The stones of Rome to rise and mutiny.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on action, angels, day, deed, doubt, envy, friendship, good, heart, honor, ingratitude, judgment, kindness, love, men, nobility, overcoming, perception, pity, power, preparation, privacy, reason, soul, speech, tears, time,

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle: I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii: Look, in this place ran Cassius' dagger through: See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar follow'd it, As rushing out of doors, to be resolved If Brutus so unkindly knock'd, or no; For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all; For when the noble Caesar saw him stab, Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquish'd him: then burst his mighty heart; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's Statua, Which all the while ran blood, great Cæsar fell, O! what a fall was there, my countrymen; Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors. . . . . Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up To such a sudden flood of mutiny. They that have done this deed are honourable: What private griefs they have, alas! I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will no doubts with reason answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend. . . . . For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action , nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood; I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Mark Antony in Act 3, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

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