principles

A Quote by Theodore Parker on democracy, eternity, freedom, god, government, ideas, justice, laws, people, and principles

There is what I call the American idea. . . . This idea demands, as the proximate organization thereof, a democracy,-that is, a government of all the people, by all the people, for all the people; of course, a government of the principles of eternal justice, the unchanging law of God. For shortness' sake I will call it the idea of Freedom.

Theodore Parker (1810 - 1860)

Source: Speech at the N. E. Antislavery Convention, Boston, May 29, 1850.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Parker on democracy, eternity, freedom, god, government, ideas, justice, laws, people, and principles

A democracy,- that is a government of all the people, by all the people, for all the people; of course, a government of the principles of eternal justice, the unchanging law of God; for shortness' sake I will call it the idea of Freedom.

Theodore Parker (1810 - 1860)

Source: The American Idea: Speech at N. E. Anti-Slavery Convention, Boston, May 29, 1850.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Judge Stewart Dalzell on argument, conversation, government, internet, principles, and speech

The Internet may fairly be regarded as a never-ending worldwide conversation. The government may not, through the [Communications Decency Act], interrupt that conversation. . . . As the most participatory form of mass speech yet developed, the Internet deserves the highest protection from governmental intrusion. . . . The government, therefore, implicitly asks this court to limit both the amount of speech on the Internet and the availability of that speech. This argument is profoundly repugnant to First Amendment principles.

Stewart Dalzell

Source: 1996, ACLU, et al., v Janet Reno, 96-963 and ALA, et al., v Dept of Justice, 96-1458

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen L. Richards on achievement, alienation, authors, certainty, constitution, daughters, divinity, eternity, exercise, fatherhood, fighting, gifts, god, good, history, independence, laws, liberty, men, nobility, principles, slavery, sons,

I have read and heard a good many statements by eminent writers and speakers to the effect that our liberty of which we are justly proud is an achievement, and not a gift. In the sense that it had to be worked for, fought for, and preserved with vigilance these statements are true. But let it never be forgotten that our concept of liberty is a gift. No human is the author of that concept. Many great men have so recognized it as did Thomas Jefferson when he wrote the Declaration of Independence and declared that "men are endowed with certain inalienable rights." Why are these rights inalienable? Because men did not create the right to liberty! In the exercise of his free agency he may surrender his privileges, and his property, and he may become the slave of others or of the state, but his free agency is as native to him as the air he breathes. It is part and parcel of his eternal constitution, and Jefferson was "righter than I think he himself knew" when he declared it an endowment which cannot be alienated. The message which we bear affirms that God is the Author of our inalienable liberty; that men, all men are of noble lineage, sons and daughters of the Eternal Father; and that liberty is their birthright. I thank God that . . . noble men were blessed with this lofty concept of man's inherent right to liberty and that they were prompted to incorporate these divine principles in the organic law and history of our favored land.

Stephen L. Richards (1879 - 1959)

Source: Ensign, November 1947.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by St. John de Crévecoeur on chance, direction, principles, punishment, and timidity

He who governs himself according to what he calls his principles may be punished either by one party or the other for those very principles. He who proceeds without principle, as chance, timidity, or self-preservation directs, will not perhaps fare better; but he will be less blamed.

St. John de Crevecoeur

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sogyal Rinpoche on egotism and principles

It is important to remember always that the principle of egolessness does not mean that there was an ego in the first place, and the Buddhists did away with it. On the contrary, it means there was never any ego at all to begin with. To realize that is called "egolessness."

Sogyal Rinpoche

Source: Sogyal Rinpoche in The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, HarperCollins Publishers, 1993, p. 121

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Socrates on desires, excellence, guidance, judgment, pleasure, and principles

In every one of us there are two ruling and directing principles, whose guidance we follow wherever they may lead; the one being an innate desire of pleasure; the other, an acquired judgment which aspires after excellence.

Socrates (469 - 399 BC)

Source: Quoted in: Plato, Phaedrus.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir William Osler on adversity, courage, danger, despair, disappointment, failure, idealism, life, patience, principles, and superiority

Be calm and strong and patient. Meet failure and disappointment with courage. Rise superior to the trials of life, and never give in to hopelessness or despair. In danger, in adversity, cling to your principles and ideals. Aequanimitas!

Sir William Osler (1849 - 1919)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir William Blackstone on constitution and principles

That the king can do no wrong, is a necessary and fundamental principle of the English constitution.

Sir William Blackstone (1723 - 1780)

Source: Commentaries on the Laws of England

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on ambition, glory, honor, perfection, principles, and virtue

To be ambitious of true honor, of the true glory and perfection of our natures, is the very principle and incentive of virtue.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Contributed by: Zaady

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