principles

A Quote by Alfred Jules Ayer on certainty, facts, logic, mathematics, principles, purity, purpose, questions, and virtue

A point which is not sufficiently brought out by Russell, if indeed it is recognized by him at all, is that every logical proposition is valid in its own right. Its validity does not depend upon its being incorporated in a system, and deduced from certain propositions which are taken as self-evident. The construction of systems of logic is useful as a means of discovering and certifying analytic propositions, but it is not in principle essential even for this purpose. For it is possible to conceive of a symbolism in which every analytic proposition could be seen to be analytic in virtue of its form alone. The fact that the validity of an analytic proposition in no way depends on its being deducible from other analytic propositions is our justification for disregarding the question whether the propositions of mathematics are reducible to propositions of formal logic, in the way that Russell supposed (1919, chap. 2). For even if it is the case that the definition of a cardinal number as a class of classes similar to a given class is circular, and it is not possible to reduce mathematical notions to purely logical notions, it will still remain true that the propositions of mathematics are analytic propositions. They will form a special class of analytic propositions, containing special terms, but they will be none the less analytic for that. For the criterion of an analytic proposition is that its validity should follow simply from the definition of the terms contained in it, and this condition is fulfilled by the propositions of pure mathematics.

A.J. Ayer

Source: Language Truth and Logic, Ayer, Ch.4, p.108

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aesop on principles

He that always gives way to others will end in having no principles of his own.

Aesop (620 - 560 BC)

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A Quote by Adlai Ewing Stevenson on principles

It is often easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them.

Adlai Stevenson (1900 - 1965)

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A Quote by Adlai Ewing Stevenson on principles

It is often easier to fight for principles than to live up to them.

Adlai Stevenson (1900 - 1965)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on interest and principles

Moral principle is a looser bond than pecuniary interest.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on defense, government, loyalty, presidency, principles, war, and words

There is an important sense in which government is distinctive from administration. One is perpetual, the other is temporary and changeable. A man may be loyal to his government and yet oppose the particular principles and methods of administration. Attributed to Representative Abraham Lincoln. by W. T. Roche, address at Washington, Kansas, April 9, 1942: "These words were spoken by Lincoln, then a Congressman, in defense of his condemnation of President Polk for provoking the Mexican War."

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Congressional Record, April 15, 1942, vol. 88, Appendix, p. A1493.

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on principles

Important principles may and must be inflexible.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: 1865

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on control, government, laws, principles, prohibition, and reason

Prohibition goes beyond the bounds of reason in that it attempts to control a man's appetite by legislation and makes crimes out of things that are not crimes. A prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principles upon which our government was founded.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on beginning, god, hope, ideas, inspiration, labor, men, mind, principles, and work

It is better then, to save the work while it is begun. You have done the labor; maintain it - keep it. If men choose to serve you, go with them; but as you have made up your organization upon principle, stand by it; for as surely as God reigns over you, and has inspired your mind, and given you a sense of propriety, and continues to give you hope, so surely will you still cling to these ideas, and you will at last come back after your wanderings, merely to do your work over again.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: speech at Chicago, Illinois, July 10, 1858.

Contributed by: Zaady

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