pride

A Quote by Alexander Pope on angels, men, and pride

Pride still is aiming at the blest abodes; Men would be angels, angels would be gods. Aspiring to be gods, if angels fell, Aspiring to be angels, men rebel.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on blindness, failure, judgment, mind, pride, rules, vices, and weakness

Of all the causes which conspire to blind Man's erring judgment, and misguide the mind; What the weak head with strongest bias rules,- Is pride, the never-failing vice of fools.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on angels, errors, lies, men, and pride

In pride, in reasoning pride, our error lies; All quit their sphere, and rush into the skies. Pride still is aiming at the blest abodes: Men would be angels, angels would be gods. Aspiring to be gods, if angels fell, Aspiring to be angels, men rebel.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 123.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on art, chance, clarity, direction, evil, good, harmony, nature, pride, reason, truth, and understanding

All nature is but art, unknown to thee; All chance, direction, which thou canst not see; All discord, harmony not understood; All partial evil, universal good; And spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 289.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on acting, bravery, death, lies, pride, and slavery

Who combats bravely is not therefore brave, He dreads a death-bed like the meanest slave: Who reasons wisely is not therefore wise,- His pride in reasoning, not in acting lies.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 115.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on ambition, death, justice, life, and pride

Awake, my St. John! leave all meaner things To low ambition and the pride of kings. Let us (since life can little more supply Than just to look about us, and to die) Expatiate free o'er all this scene of man; A mighty maze! but not without a plan.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Akhnaton [Ikhnaton or Akhenaton] on arrogance, laughter, observation, and pride

Behold the vain man, and observe the arrogant; he clotheth himself in rich attire, he walketh in the public street, he casteth round his eyes, and courteth observation. He tosseth up his head, and overlooketh the poor; he treateth his inferiors with insolence, his superiors in return look down on his pride and folly with laughter.

Akhnaton (c.1375 - c.1353 BC)

Source: title taken by Amenhotep IV

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anna Letitia (Aikin) Barbauld on pride and time

in

And when midst fallen London, they survey The stone where Alexander's ashes lay, Shall own with humbled pride the lesson must By Time's slow finger written in the dust.

Aikin Barbauld (1743 - 1825)

Source: Eighteen Hundred and Eleven

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on adversity, affliction, good, men, philosophy, poets, pride, prosperity, and words

It is said an Eastern monarch once charged his wise men to invent him a sentence, to be ever in view, and which should be true and appropriate in all times and situations. They presented him the words: 'And this, too, shall pass away.' How much it expresses! How chastening in the hour of pride! - how consoling in the depth of affliction! Many versions of this story exist. Another one is: "The Sultan asked for a Signet motto, that should hold good for Adversity or Prosperity. Solomon gave him, 'This also shall pass away.'" - Edward Fitzgerald, Polonius: A Collection of Wise Saws and Modern Instances, item 112, p. 80 (1901). The words In neez bogzarad, which can be translated, "This also shall pass," appear in the Diven of the twelfth century Persian poet and philosopher, Sana'I of Ghaznl, ed. Mazahir Musaffa, p. 92 (1957).

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 30, 1859.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on anguish, fatherhood, freedom, grief, losing, love, memory, motherhood, presidency, pride, sacrifice, sons, war, weakness, and words

Dear Madam,-I have been shown in the files of the War Department a Statement of the Adjutant General of Massachusetts, that you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on the field of battle. I feel how weak and fruitless must be any words of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering to you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save. I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours, to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of Freedom. Yours, very sincerely and respectfully, President Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Letter to Mrs. Lydia Bixby, Nov. 21, 1864. Records later corrected: only two sons died.

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content