pride

A Quote by François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld on correction, criticism, faults, friendship, pride, and virtue

Our pride rather than our virtue criticizes the faults of others: We reprove our friends less to correct their faults than to show that we-ourselves are free of them.

Duc de La Rochefoucauld (1613 - 1680)

Source: Réflexions ou Sentences et Maximes Morales

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld on pride, vanity, and wishes

Pride does not wish to owe and vanity does not wish to pay.

Duc de La Rochefoucauld (1613 - 1680)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld on acceptance, ideas, ignorance, and pride

Pride more often than ignorance makes us refuse to accept new ideas: finding the first places taken in the intellectual parade, we refuse to take the last.

Duc de La Rochefoucauld (1613 - 1680)

Source: Réflexions ou Sentences et Maximes Morales

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Alexis Carrel on action, beginning, fear, grace, habits, humility, journeys, life, obligation, observation, prayer, pride, selfishness, sincerity, and soul

If you make a habit of sincere prayer, your life will be very noticeably and profoundly altered. Prayer stamps with its indelible mark our actions and demeanor. A tranquillity of bearing, a facial and bodily repose, are observed in those whose inner lives are thus enriched. Within the depths of consciousness a flame kindles. And man sees himself. He discovers his selfishness, his silly pride, his fears, his greeds, his blunders. He develops a sense of moral obligation, intellectual humility. Thus begins a journey of the soul toward the realm of grace. . . . [Continued]

Dr. Alexis Carrel (1873 - 1944)

Source: Tocqueville in Democracy in America, 1835

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Douglas Jerrold on fate, love, and pride

And every man, in love or pride, Of his fate is never wide.

Douglas Jerrold (1803 - 1857)

Source: Nemesis.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dante Alighieri on angels, day, fatherhood, forgiveness, god, grace, heaven, humility, learning, love, men, merit, peace, power, praise, prayer, pride, proof, and strength

They find seven cornices on which penitent and redeemed sinners are cleansed by the grace of God. On the first cornice, that of Pride, the proud are learning humility: Our Father, dwelling in the Heavens, nowise As circumscribed, but as the things above, Thy first effects, are dearer in Thine eyes, Hallowed Thy name be and the Power thereof, By every creature, as right meet it is We praise the tender effluence of Thy love. Let come to us, let come Thy kingdom's peace; If it come not, we've no power of our own To come to it, for all our subtleties. Like as with glad Hosannas at Thy throne Thine angels offer up their wills alway, So let men offer theirs, that Thine be done. Our daily manna give to us this day, Without which he that through this desert wild Toils most to speed goes backward on his way. As we, with all our debtors reconciled, Forgive, do thou forgive us, nor regard Our merits, but upon our sins look mild. Put not our strength, too easily ensnared And overcome, to proof with the old foe; But save us from him, for he tries it hard. This last prayer is not made for us-we know Dear Lord, that it is needless-but for those Who still remain behind us we pray so.

Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321)

Source: Inferno

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dante Alighieri on envy, pride, and soul

Pride, envy, avarice - these are the sparks have set on fire the souls of man.

Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Daniel Defoe on hell, presidency, and pride

Pride, the first peer and president of hell.

Daniel Defoe (1661 - 1731)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on action, interest, kindness, money, poverty, pride, reward, shame, struggle, virtue, and taoism

The man in whom Tao acts without impediment harms no other being by his actions yet he does not know himself to be "kind", to be "gentle". . . . (He) does not bother with his own interests and does not despise others who do. He does not struggle to make money and does not make a virtue of poverty. He goes his way without relying on others and does not pride himself on walking alone. While he does not follow the crowd he won't complain of those who do. Rank and reward make no appeal to him; disgrace and shame do not deter him. He is not always looking for right and wrong, always deciding "Yes" or "No." The ancients said, therefore: The man of Tao remains unknown. Perfect virtue produces nothing. "No-Self" is "True-Self". And the greatest man is Nobody.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 17:3, pp. 137-138

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on glory, music, praise, pride, and soul

The harp that once through Tara's halls The soul of music shed, Now hangs as mute on Tara's walls As if that soul were fled. So sleeps the pride of former days, So glory's thrill is o'er; And hearts that once beat high for praise Now feel that pulse no more.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: The Harp that once through Tara's Halls.

Contributed by: Zaady

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