presidency

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, beginning, borrowing, business, challenge, company, debate, defeat, failure, fame, family, force, friendship, home, jobs, journeys, laws, losing, majorities, minorities, money, motherhood, performance, politics, pop

Here's Abraham Lincoln's incredible journey to become the sixteenth president of the United States of America! 1809 - Born February 12 in a log cabin in the backwoods of Hardin County (now Larue County), Kentucky 1816 - He worked to support his family after they were forced out of their home. 1818 - His mother, Nancy Hanks, died. 1831 - Failed in business. 1832 - Defeated for Illinois House of Representatives. 1832 - Lost his job, couldn't get into law school, worked odd jobs. 1832 - Chosen captain of company of volunteers which did not see battle in the Black Hawk War. 1833 - Grocery business failed. Declared bankruptcy, yet paid off the money he borrowed from friends to start his business. 1834 - Elected to Illinois state legislature and served four successive terms (until 1841). 1836 - Obtained license as an attorney. 1837 - Became law partner in Springfield, Illinois, with John T. Stuart. 1838 - Defeated in becoming speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives. 1840 - Defeated in becoming elector. 1842 - Married Mary Todd on Nov. 4. They had four sons. 1843 - Defeated for US House of Representatives. 1847 - Served one term in US House of Representatives as a Whig. 1849 - Defeated for US House of Representatives. 1849 - Rejected for the position of Commissioner of the General Land Office. 1849 - Retired from politics. 1855 - Defeated for US Senate as a Whig. 1855 - Became a Republican. 1856 - Considered for vice-president (got less than 100 votes in convention). 1858 - Nominated as the Republican candidate for US Senator from Illinois. 1858 - Challenged Stephen A. Douglas. The seven debates became famous. 1858 - Defeated for US Senate as a Republican, he had made his mark. 1860 - Selected as the Republican candidate for president. 1860 - Elected president of the United States with a minority of the popular vote. 1861 - Inaugurated March 4. 1861 - Seven states had seceded by the time of his inauguration. 1861 - On April 12, Fort Sumter was fired upon and the Civil War had begun. 1863 - Issued Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1. 1864 - Elected to second term as president by a great majority. 1865 - On April 9, Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen. Ulysses S. Grant signed the terms of Confederate Surrender. 1865 - On April 14, Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth while attending a performance at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC. He died the next morning.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, belief, cities, conversation, elections, freedom, god, injustice, prayer, presidency, privacy, slavery, speech, words, and work

I know there is a God, and that He hates injustice and slavery. I see the storm coming, and I know that His hand is in it. If he has a place and work for me - and I think He has - I believe I am ready. This comment was made in a private conversation with Newton Bateman, superintendent of public instruction for the state of Illinois, a few days before the election of 1860. During the election of 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy used the same words in a speech to the United Steelworkers of America convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, September 19, 1960. - Freedom of Communications, final report of the Committee on Commerce, United States Senate, part 1, p. 286 (1961). Senate Report. 87-994. As president, he used a variation of these words at the 10th annual presidential prayer breakfast, March 1, 1962. - Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: John F Kennedy, 1962, p. 176.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Attributed in. — Joseph Gilbert Holland, The Life of Abraham Lincoln,1886, Unverified.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on anecdotes, art, beginning, character, communication, freedom, gold, government, life, people, presidency, privacy, silence, and worth

Gentlemen, suppose all the property you were worth was in gold, and you had put it in the hands of Blondin to carry across the Niagara River on a rope, would you shake the cable, or keep shouting out to him - "Blondin, stand up a little straighter - Blondin, stoop a little more - go a little faster - lean a little more to the north - lean a little more to the south?" No, you would hold your breath as well as your tongue, and keep your hands off until he was safe over. The Government are carrying an immense weight. Untold treasures are in their hands. They are doing the very best they can. Don't badger them. Keep silence, and we'll get you safe across. -Francis B. Carpenter, "Anecdotes and Reminiscences of President Lincoln" in Henry Jarvis Raymond, The Life and Public Services of Abraham Lincoln..., p. 752 (1865). Carpenter, a portrait artist, lived in the White House for six months beginning February 1864, to paint the president and the entire Cabinet. His relations with the president became of an "intimate character," and he was permitted "the freedom of his private office at almost all hours,...privileged to see and know more of his daily life" than most people. He states that he "endeavored to embrace only those [anecdotes] which bear the marks of authenticity. Many....I myself heard the President relate; others were communicated to me by persons who either heard or took part in them" (p. 725). Blondin (real name Jean Francois Gravelet) was a French tightrope walker who crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope in 1855, 1859, and 1860.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: reply to critics 1864, Francis B. Carpenter, in H J Raymond, Life & Public Service of A. Lincoln

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on attitude, criticism, destruction, enemies, friendship, and presidency

President Lincoln was once criticized for his attitude toward his enemies. "Why do you try to make friends of them?" asked an associate. "You should try to destroy them." "Am I not destroying my enemies," Lincoln gently replied, "when I make them my friends?"

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, angels, nations, peace, presidency, success, vietnam, war, and words

I do the very best I know how - the very best I can; and I mean to keep doing so until the end. If the end brings me out all right, what is said against me won't amount to anything. If the end brings me out wrong, ten angels swearing I was right would make no difference. NOTE: President Richard M. Nixon used similar words about his plan for peace in an address to the nation on the war in Vietnam, November 3, 1969: "If it does succeed, what the critics say now won't matter. If it does not succeed, anything I say then won't matter." - Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Richard Nixon, 1969, p. 909.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: President Abraham Lincoln. — Francis Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, 1867

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on presidency

As President, I have no eyes but constitutional eyes; I cannot see you.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Attributed reply to South Carolina Commissioners

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on anguish, fatherhood, freedom, grief, losing, love, memory, motherhood, presidency, pride, sacrifice, sons, war, weakness, and words

Dear Madam,-I have been shown in the files of the War Department a Statement of the Adjutant General of Massachusetts, that you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on the field of battle. I feel how weak and fruitless must be any words of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering to you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save. I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours, to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of Freedom. Yours, very sincerely and respectfully, President Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Letter to Mrs. Lydia Bixby, Nov. 21, 1864. Records later corrected: only two sons died.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on defeat, democracy, elections, laughter, newspapers, presidency, and speech

He said that he felt "like the boy that stumped his toe,-'it hurt too bad to laugh, and he was too big to cry.'" Attributed to Abraham Lincoln by John T. Morse, Jr., Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 149 (1893), referring to Lincoln's defeat by Senator Stephen Douglas in the 1858 senatorial campaign in Illinois. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, November 22, 1862, p. 131, attributed this reply to President Lincoln, when asked how he felt about the result of the New York election (where the Democratic candidate won the governorship]: "Somewhat like that boy in Kentucky, who stubbed his toe while running to see his sweetheart. The boy said he was too big to cry, and far too badly hurt to laugh." Adlai Stevenson told this story in his nationally-televised concession speech after the 1952 presidential election: "Someone asked me, as I came in, down on the street, how I felt, and I was reminded of a story that a fellow-townsman of ours used to tell-Abraham Lincoln. They asked him how he felt once after an unsuccessful election. He said that he was too old to cry, but it hurt too much to laugh."-The Papers of Adlai E. Stevenson, ed. Walter Johnson, vol. 4, p. 188 (1974). The speech was delivered at the Leland Hotel Springfield, Illinois, in the early hours of November 5, 1952.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

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