prayer

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on action, idleness, prayer, understanding, and women

Prayer is not an old woman's idle amusement. Properly understood and applied, it is the most potent instrument of action.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on heart, prayer, soul, weakness, and words

Prayer is not asking. It is a longing of the soul. It is daily admission of one's weakness. . . . It is better in prayer to have a heart without words than words without a heart.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

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A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on prayer

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Prayer is the key of the morning and the bolt of the evening.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

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A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on language, prayer, and soul

Prayer is not asking. It is a language of the soul.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

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A Quote by "Mahatma" Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi on life and prayer

Let everyone try and find that as a result of daily prayer he adds something new to his life, something with which nothing can be compared.

Gandhi (1869 - 1948)

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A Quote by G. A. Studdert Kennedy on heroism, originality, pain, people, prayer, sorrow, and tears

We have taught our people to use prayer too much as a means of comfort - not in the original and heroic sense of uplifting, inspiring, strengthening, but in the more modern and baser sense of soothing sorrow, dulling pain, and drying tears - the comfort of the cushion, not the comfort of the Cross.

G. A. Studdert Kennedy

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on christ, mountains, prayer, unhappiness, and words

Concerning the prayer that mountains fall to crush and hide, Farrar , says: "These words of Christ met with a painfully literal illustration when hundreds of the unhappy Jews at the siege of Jerusalem hid themselves in the darkest and vilest subterranean recesses, and when, besides those who were hunted out, no less than two thousand were killed by being buried under the ruins of their hiding places."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.645 note, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.35, p.667

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on failure, forgiveness, mercy, prayer, truth, and wisdom

And now I send these pages forth, not knowing what shall befall them, but with the earnest prayer that they may be blessed to aid the cause of truth and righteousness, and that He in whose name they are written may, of His mercy, "Forgive them where they fail in truth, And in His wisdom make me wise."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: final paragraph of the Preface of Life of Christ

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on anger, christ, faith, life, love, peace, persecution, philosophy, prayer, and secrets

The following sentiments are illustrative of the philosophy of the Talmud: "Love peace and pursue it at any cost." ... "Remember it is better to be persecuted than to persecute." ... "Be not prone to anger." ... "He who giveth alms in secret is greater than Moses himself." ... "It is better to utter a short prayer with devotion than a long one without fervor." ... "He who having but one piece of bread in his basket, and says, What shall I eat tomorrow? is a man of little faith." (Farrar, The Life of Christ, p. 680.)

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.680

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A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on acting, justice, money, nations, and prayer

Touching the matter of the defilement to which the temple courts had been subjected by traffickers acting under priestly license, Farrar gives us the following: "And this was the entrance-court to the Temple of the Most High! The court which was a witness that that house should be a House of Prayer for all nations had been degraded into a place which, for foulness, was more like shambles, and for bustling commerce more like a densely crowded bazaar; while the lowing of oxen, the bleating of sheep, the Babel of many languages, the huckstering and wrangling, and the clinking of money and of balances (perhaps not always just), might be heard in the adjoining courts, disturbing the chant of the Levites and the prayers of priests!"

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.152, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.8, p.108

Contributed by: Zaady

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