practicality

A Quote by Ayn Rand on business, conflict, desires, destruction, interest, lies, men, practicality, reality, sacrifice, trade, understanding, value, and work

Did it ever occur to you, that there is no conflict of interests among men, neither in business nor in trade nor in their most personal desires - if they omit the irrational from their view of the possible and destruction from their view of the practical? There is no conflict, and no call for sacrifice, and no man is a threat to the aims of another - if men understand that reality is an absolute not to be faked, that lies do not work, that the unearned cannot be had, that the undeserved cannot be given, that the destruction of a value which is, will not bring value to that which isn't.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 736)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Austin O'Malley on practicality and prayer

Practical prayer is harder on the soles of your shoes than on the knees of your trousers.

Austin O'Malley (1858 - 1932)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur Milton on abuse, automobiles, desires, home, life, needs, practicality, and service

Life without credit would be horrid. Life with too much credit is worse than horrid - its a nightmare. Credit always costs. Whenever you say "charge it!" You are paying something more, in one way or another, than you would pay for the same item or service in cash. There is a plus to credit if one can use it wisely. For a home, for an automobile, for schooling, etc. But take care - don't abuse it. Stay well below "your desires." And pay off as quickly as you can. Take care of what you have and have as little as you really need. Buy "used" when practical. Make do with what you have until you can pay cash for consumable items.

Arthur Milton

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection,

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arnold Joseph Toynbee on action, death, history, life, and practicality

History not used is nothing, for all intellectual life is action, like practical life, and if you don't use the stuff - well, it might as well be dead.

Arnold Joseph Toynbee (1889 - 1975)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arnold Joseph Toynbee on children, confidence, heart, husbands, life, mistrust, motherhood, needs, possibility, practicality, secrets, wives, and world

The world's greatest need . . . is mutual confidence. No human being ever knows all the secrets of another's heart. Yet there is enough confidence between mother and child, husband and wife, buyer and seller . . . to make social life a practical possibility. Confidence may be risky, but it is nothing like so risky as mistrust.

Arnold Joseph Toynbee (1889 - 1975)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on achievement, clarity, goal, idealism, money, practicality, wisdom, objective, end, and means

First, have a definite, clear practical ideal; a goal, an objective. Second, have the necessary means to achieve your ends: wisdom, money, materials, and methods. Third, adjust all your means to that end.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on leisure, mathematics, needs, practicality, research, and skill

Now that practical skills have developed enough to provide adequately for material needs, one of these sciences which are not devoted to utilitarian ends [mathematics] has been able to arise in Egypt, the priestly caste there having the leisure necessary for disinterested research.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Source: Metaphysica, 1-981b

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on belief, fame, ideas, population, practicality, and soldiers

MALTHUSIAN, adj. Pertaining to Malthus and his doctrines, who believed in artificially limiting population, but found that it could not be done by talking. Herod of Judea, all the famous soldiers have been practical exponents of the Malthusian idea.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Graham Bell on men, mind, practicality, success, and thought

The most successful men in the end are those whose success is the result of steady accretion. . . It is the man who carefully advances step by step, with his mind becoming wider and wider - and progressively better able to grasp any theme or situation - persevering in what he knows to be practical, and concentrating his thought upon it, who is bound to succeed in the greatest degree.

Alexander Graham Bell (1847 - 1922)

Contributed by: Zaady

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