poets

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on borrowing, maturity, and poets

Immature poets borrow, mature poets steal.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen Spender on memory, people, and poets

The greatest poets are those with memories so great that they extend beyond their strongest experiences to their minutest observations of people and things far outside their own self-centeredness.

Stephen Spender

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on fatherhood, genius, heroism, justice, poets, saints, women, and world

It is through woman that ideality is born into the world and - what were man without her! There is many a man who has become a genius through a woman, many a one a hero, many a one a poet, many a one even a saint; but he did not become a genius through the woman he married, for through her he only became a privy councillor; he did not become a hero through the woman he married, for through her he only became a general; he did not become a poet through the woman he married, for through her he only became a father; he did not become a saint through the woman he married, for he did not marry, and would have married but one - the one whom he did not marry; just as the others became a genius, became a hero, became a poet through the help of the woman they did not marry.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

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A Quote by Søren Aabye Kierkegaard on anguish, heart, music, poets, and unhappiness

What is a poet? An unhappy person who conceals profound anguish in his heart but whose lips are so formed that as sighs and cries pass over them they sound like beautiful music.

Soren Kierkegaard (1813 - 1855)

Source: EITHER/OR VOL. 1 1843

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A Quote by Sir William Davenant on heroism, liberty, pleasure, and poets

How much pleasure they lose (and even the pleasures of heroic poesy are not unprofitable) who take away the liberty of a poet, and fetter his feet in the shackles of a historian.

Sir William Davenant (1606 - 1668)

Source: Letter from S. T. Coleridge to Thomas Hobbes, Biographia Literaria, 1817.

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A Quote by Sir William Davenant on beauty, blindness, death, doubt, knowledge, life, love, lovers, philosophy, poets, sorrow, and time

To a Mistress Dying Lover. YOUR beauty, ripe and calm and fresh As eastern summers are, Must now, forsaking time and flesh, Add light to some small star. Philosopher. Whilst she yet lives, were stars decay'd, Their light by hers relief might find; But Death will lead her to a shade Where Love is cold and Beauty blind. Lover. Lovers, whose priests all poets are, Think every mistress, when she dies, Is changed at least into a star: And who dares doubt the poet wise? Philosopher. But ask not bodies doom'd to die To what abode they go; Since Knowledge is but Sorrow's spy, It is not safe to know.

Sir William Davenant (1606 - 1668)

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on nature and poets

Call it not vain: they do not err Who say that when the poet dies Mute Nature mourns her worshipper, And celebrates his obsequies.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: The Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1805, Canto v. Stanza 1.

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on losing, poets, and simplicity

For ne'er was lost on poet's ear: A simple race! They waste their toil For the vain tribute of a smile.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: The Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1805, Canto v. Stanza 1.

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A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on flattery, losing, poets, and simplicity

Ne'er Was flattery lost on poet's ear; A simple race! they waste their toil For the vain tribute of a smile.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: Lay of the Last Minstrel, 1805, canto iv, conclusion

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A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on excellence, needs, and poets

There have been many most excellent poets that have never versified, and now swarm many versifiers that need never answer to the name of poets.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: Defence of Poesie, written 1579-80; published 1595

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