poetry

A Quote by Ezra Pound on poetry and prose

Poetry must be as well written as prose.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Letter to Harriet Monroe, January 1915

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Pound on art, country, death, poetry, and time

For three years, out of key with his time, He strove to resuscitate the dead art Of poetry; to maintain "the sublime" In the old sense. Wrong from the start- No, hardly, but seeing he had been born In a half savage country, out of date.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Hugh Selwyn Mauberley. E.P. Ode pour l’élection de son sepulchre, 1920, I

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on books, poetry, sky, and summer

To see the Summer Sky
Is Poetry, though never in a Book it lie -
True Poems flee -

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, no. 1472, ed. Thomas H. Johnson, 1955.

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on body, books, and poetry

If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can ever warm me, I know that is poetry.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: 1870, in The Life and Letters of Emily Dickinson, ed. Martha Dickinson Bianchi, 1924.

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on poetry

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If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.  Is there any other way?

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: 1870, in The Life and Letters of Emily Dickinson, ed. Martha Dickinson Bianchi, 1924.

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A Quote by Emily Dickinson on books and poetry

There is no Frigate like a Book To take us Lands away Nor any Coursers like a Page Of prancing Poetry.

Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)

Source: Letter, 1885; in Letters of Emily Dickinson, ed. Mabel Loomis Todd, 1894.

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A Quote by Edward Robert Bulwer-Lytton on art, books, conscience, cooking, friendship, heart, hope, knowledge, love, music, passion, and poetry

We may live without poetry, music and art; We may live without conscience, and live without heart; We may live without friends; we may live without books; But civilized man cannot live without cooks. . . . He may live without books,-what is knowledge but grieving? He may live without hope,-what is hope but deceiving? He may live without love,-what is passion but pining? But where is the man that can live without dining?

Edward Robert Bulwer-Lytton (1831 - 1891)

Source: pseudonym: Owen Meredith, Lucile, pt. i, c.2. xix & xxiv

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A Quote by Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton on poetry and talent

Every great man exhibits the talent of organization or construction, whether it be in a poem, a philosophical system, a policy, or a strategy. And without method there is no organization nor construction.

Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton (1803 - 1873)

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A Quote by Ebenezer Elliott on angels, children, day, despair, fame, god, heart, laws, men, mercy, nations, people, poetry, and support

Written in support of abolishing the Corn Laws, it became Elliott's most famous poem. The Peoples Anthem When wilt thou save the people Oh, God of mercy! When? Not kings and lords, but nations! Not thrones and crowns, but men! Flowers of thy heart, of God they are. Let them not pass like weeds, away Their heritage a sunless day! God save the people! When wilt thou save the people? Oh, God of mercy! When? The people Lord the people! Not thrones and crowns, but men! God save the people! Thine they are, Thy children, as thy angels fair, Save them from bondage and despair. God save the people!

Ebenezer Elliott (1781 - 1849)

Source: Poetical Works. The People’s Anthem

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A Quote by Dusa McDuff on ideas, mathematics, poetry, and thought

Gel'fand amazed me by talking of mathematics as though it were poetry. He once said about a long paper bristling with formulas that it contained the vague beginnings of an idea which could only hint at and which he had never managed to bring out more clearly. I had always thought of mathematics as being much more straightforward: a formula is a formula, and an algebra is an algebra, but Gel'fand found hedgehogs lurking in the rows of his spectral sequences!

Dusa McDuff

Source: Mathematical Notices v. 38, no. 3, March 1991, pp. 185-7.

Contributed by: Zaady

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