poetry

A Quote by Joaquin Miller on bitterness, cities, country, death, good, heart, lies, men, motherhood, nature, order, poetry, time, traditions, and water

Oregon proper is a sort of nut - a nut with a sweet, rich kernel, but also with a bitter bark and rind-through which you have to gnaw in order to reach the kernel. Portland is the bark or rind. The rich heart of the richest young State in the Union lies nearly two hundred miles in the interior. Portland sits at the seadoor - the very gates of the State. The Orient has met the Occident here in this westmost town. One of these new men, speculator in town lots and land, who was clad in a slouch hat and enormous mud-boots reaching almost to the knees, approached me in Portland. He carried an umbrella thrust up under his arm, while his two forefingers hooked and wrestled resolutely together as he stood before me. He chewed tobacco violently, and now and then fired a brown stream far up and down the new pine sidewalk. "Can't you put this city into poetry? Yes, you kin. What's poetry good for, if it can't rize the price of land? Jist tell 'em we never had a shake. Yes, an' tell 'em that the old men never die; but jist git kivered with moss and blow away. An' tell 'em - yes tell 'em that the timber grows so tall that it takes a man an' two small boys to see to the top of a tree! Yes, an' tell 'em that we have to tie poles to the cows' horns, to let the wrinkles run out on. Yes, biggest country, richest country an' dogondest healthiest country this side of Jerichol! Yes, it is." Drip! drip! drip! Slop! slop! slop! incessantly and all the time, for an uninterrupted half a year, here in this mossy, moldy town of Portland. Rain! rain! rain! until the trees grow out of the cracks and roofs of the houses, and until, tradition says, Mother Nature comes to the aid of the inhabitants and makes them web-footed, like the water-fowl. And even then, and in the face of all this, this man stood up before me with the water fairly bending his umbrella from the weight of the rain - the rain running down his nose, his head, his hair - and there he smilingly bowed and protested that it did not really rain much in Portland; but that down about the mouth of the Columbia, at Astoria, it did "sometimes rain a-right smart."

Joaquin Miller (1837 - 1914)

Source: The New and the Old

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Russell Lowell on music, painting, poetry, silence, thought, time, and wishes

Whoever can endure unmixed delight, whoever can tolerate music and painting and poetry all in one, whoever wishes to be rid of thought and to let the busy anvils of the brain be silent for a time, let him read in the "Faery Queen."

James Lowell (1819 - 1891)

Source: Spenser.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Henry Leigh Hunt on justice and poetry

Oh for a seat in some poetic nook, Just hid with trees and sparkling with a brook!

James Henry Leigh Hunt (1784 - 1859)

Source: Politics and Poetics.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on beauty, choice, poetry, and poets

Then read from the treasured volume The poem of thy choice, And lend to the rhyme of the poet The beauty of thy voice.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on language, mankind, music, and poetry

Music is the universal language of mankind. . . . poetry their universal pastime and delight.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Havelock Ellis on kindness, money, poetry, and thinking

Thinking in its lower grades is comparable to paper money. and in its higher forms it is a kind of poetry.

Henry Ellis (1859 - 1939)

Source: The Dance of Life, 1923, ch. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on animals, books, death, earth, history, life, poetry, and study

The earth is not a mere fragment of dead history, stratum upon stratum like the leaves of a book, to be studied by geologists and antiquaries chiefly, but living poetry like the leaves of a tree, which precede flowers and fruit - not a fossil earth, but a living earth; compared with whose great central life all animal and vegetable life is merely parasitic.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Source: Walden

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on good, health, men, poetry, poets, simplicity, speech, and wonder

Good poetry seems too simple and natural a thing that when we meet it we wonder that all men are not always poets. Poetry is nothing but healthy speech.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on poetry

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We do not enjoy poetry unless we know it to be poetry.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on philosophy, poetry, and truth

Poetry implies the whole truth, philosophy expresses only a particle of it.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

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