pleasure

A Quote by William Wordsworth on pleasure, pride, and sorrow

Never to blend our pleasure or our pride With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Hart-leap Well. Part ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on bliss, company, dance, heart, lies, loneliness, pleasure, poets, solitude, thought, and wealth

I wander'd lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretch'd in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay; Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: I gazed-and gazed-but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought: For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills; And dances with the daffodils.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Makepeace Thackeray on admiration, books, company, learning, life, men, pleasure, and society

Might I give counsel to any man, I would say to him, try to frequent the company of your betters. In books and in life, that is the most wholesome society; learn to admire rightly; the great pleasure of life is that. Note what great men admire.

William Thackeray (1811 - 1863)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Makepeace Thackeray on life and pleasure

The true pleasure of life is to live with your inferiors.

William Thackeray (1811 - 1863)

Source: The Newcomes. Book i. Chap. i.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on profit, study, learning, and pleasure

No profit grows where is no pleasure ta'en:
In brief, sir, study what you most affect.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: The Taming of the Shrew Act 1, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Morris on anxiety, chance, death, earth, fear, heart, hope, life, pain, past, pleasure, and praise

April O fair mid-spring, besung so oft and oft, How can I praise thy loveliness enow? Thy sun that burns not, and thy breezes soft That o'er the blossoms of the orchard blow, The thousand things that 'neath the young leaves grow, The hopes and chances of the growing year, Winter forgotten long, and summer near. When summer brings the lily and the rose, She brings us fear-her very death she brings Hid in her anxious heart, the forge of woes; And, dull with fear, no more the mavis sings. But thou! thou diest not, but thy fresh life clings About the fainting autumn's sweet decay, When in the earth the hopeful seed they lay. Ah! life of all the year, why yet do I, Amid thy snowy blossoms' fragrant drift, Still long for that which never draweth nigh, Striving my pleasure from my pain to sift, Some weight from off my fluttering mirth to lift? - Now, when far bells are ringing "Come again, Come back, past years! why will ye pass in vain?"

William Morris (1834 - 1896)

Source: April

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William M. Peck on day, optimism, pessimism, pleasure, progress, thinking, and work

Your morning thoughts may determine your conduct for the day. Optimistic thoughts will make your day bright and productive, while pessimistic thinking will make it dull and wasteful. Face each day cheerfully, smilingly and courageously, and it will naturally follow that your work will be a real pleasure and progress will be a delightful accomplishment.

William M. Peck

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Lawson on enemies, friendship, innocence, love, needs, pleasure, and profit

. . . store of bees, in a dry and warme bee-house, comely made of fir boards, to sing, and sit, and feede upon your flowers and sprouts, make a pleasant noyse and sight. For cleanly and innocent bees, of all other things, love and become, and thrive in your orchard. If they thrive (as they must needs if your gardiner be skilfull, and love them: for they love their friends and hate none but their enemies) they will besides the pleasure, yeeld great profit, to pay him his wages; yea the increase of twenty stock of stools with other bees, will keep your orchard.

William Lawson

Source: A New Orchard and Garden, 1618

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Lawson on garden, pleasure, and senses

A garden makes all our senses swim with pleasure.

William Lawson

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Lawson on garden, paradise, and pleasure

What was paradise? But a garden, an orchard of trees and herbs. Full of pleasure, and nothing there but delights.

William Lawson

Contributed by: Zaady

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