pleasure

A Quote by Socrates on body, constitution, good, knowledge, labor, mind, and pleasure

A man should inure himself to voluntary labor, and not give up to indulgence and pleasure, as they beget no good constitution of body nor knowledge of mind.

Socrates (469 - 399 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Socrates on beauty, desires, direction, influence, inspiration, judgment, love, pleasure, reason, and violence

When desire, having rejected reason and overpowered judgment which leads to right, is set in the direction of the pleasure which beauty can inspire, and when again under the influence of its kindred desires it is moved with violent motion towards the beauty of corporeal forms, it acquires a surname from this very violent motion, and is called love.

Socrates (469 - 399 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Socrates on happiness and pleasure

Happiness is unrepented pleasure.

Socrates (469 - 399 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Socrates on desires, excellence, guidance, judgment, pleasure, and principles

In every one of us there are two ruling and directing principles, whose guidance we follow wherever they may lead; the one being an innate desire of pleasure; the other, an acquired judgment which aspires after excellence.

Socrates (469 - 399 BC)

Source: Quoted in: Plato, Phaedrus.

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A Quote by Sir William Temple on climate, entertainment, garden, paradise, plants, and pleasure

So that a paradise, among them seems to have been a large space of ground adorned and beautified with all sorts of trees, both of fruits and of forest, either found there before it was enclosed, or planted after; either cultivated like gardens, for shades and for walks, with fountains or streams, and all sorts of plants usual in the climate, and pleasant to the eye, the smell, or the taste; or else employed like our parks, for enclosure and harbor of all sorts of wild beasts, as well, as for the pleasure of riding and walking: and so they were of more or less extent, and of different entertainment, according to the several humors of the Princes that ordered and enclosed them.

Sir William Temple (1881 - 1944)

Source: Upon the Gardens of Epicurus; or, Of Gardening, 1685.

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A Quote by Sir William Davenant on heroism, liberty, pleasure, and poets

How much pleasure they lose (and even the pleasures of heroic poesy are not unprofitable) who take away the liberty of a poet, and fetter his feet in the shackles of a historian.

Sir William Davenant (1606 - 1668)

Source: Letter from S. T. Coleridge to Thomas Hobbes, Biographia Literaria, 1817.

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A Quote by Sir Robert Baden-Powell on age, charity, children, day, diet, duty, finance, freedom, home, leisure, life, love, mankind, mind, peace, pleasure, sacred, wives, and work

Possibly the best suggestion in condensed form, as to how to live, was given by my old Headmaster, Dr. Haig Brown, in 1904, when he wrote his Recipe for Old Age. A diet moderate and spare, Freedom from base financial care, Abundant work and little leisure, A love of duty more than pleasure, An even and contented mind In charity with all mankind, Some thoughts too sacred for display In the broad light of common day, A peaceful home, a loving wife, Children, who are a crown of life; These lengthen out the years of man Beyond the Psalmist's narrow span.

Sir Robert Baden-Powell (1857 - 1941)

Source: Lessons from the varsity of life

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A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on love, mind, and pleasure

Leave me, O Love, which reachest but to dust, And thou, my mind, aspire to higher things; Grow rich in that which never taketh rust; Whatever fades, but fading pleasure brings.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: The Arcadia, 1580

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A Quote by Sir John Lubbock on kindness, pleasure, and words

Some words are like rays of sunshine, others like barbed arrows or the bite of a serpent. And if hard words cut so deep, how much pleasure can kind ones give?

Sir John Lubbock (1834 - 1916)

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A Quote by Sidonie Gabrielle Claudine Colette on alcohol, cats, charity, death, influence, nobility, play, pleasure, and violence

A bestial and violent man will go so far as to kill because he is under the influence of drink, exasperated, or driven by rage and alcohol. He is paltry. He does not know the pleasure of killing, the charity of bestowing death like a caress, of linking it with the play of the noble wild beasts: every cat, every tiger, embraces its prey and licks it even while it destroys it.

Sidonie Gabrielle Claudine Colette (1873 - 1954)

Contributed by: Zaady

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