pity

A Quote by Walt Whitman on certainty, children, day, pity, and wonder

There was a child went forth everyday, And the first object he looked upon and received with wonder or pity or dread, that object he became, And that object became part of him for the day or a certain part of the day... or for many years or stretching cycles of years...

Walt Whitman (1819 - 1892)

Source: There Was a Child Went Forth, in Leaves of Grass

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Victor L. Brown on attitude, bitterness, circumstances, eternity, faith, family, good, hope, injustice, knowledge, life, optimism, pity, preparation, trying, and words

What bitterness could have enveloped them. They could have taken the attitude that the Lord was unjust. They had lived good lives. Why did this have to happen to a boy with such bright prospects? But rather, this was their attitude, in their own words: "We shall be eternally grateful for the thirteen wonderful years that we were privileged to have him in our midst. We know that we are blessed in the knowledge that we are sealed as an eternal family. We know that Carl was preparing to fill a mission. We know that he was prepared for that mission and that he is now filling it." No self-pity here, but rather an attitude of faith and hope and optimism, even under the most trying of circumstances!

Victor L. Brown (1914 - 1995)

Source: Conference Report, April 1964, Pg. 92

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on angels, brothers, complaints, courage, emptiness, heart, journeys, misfortune, needs, optimism, pity, songs, strength, and worry

A wayfarer carried a heavy sack about which he complained unceasingly. From none could he get help or comfort. And as he slowly journeyed, groaning under his burden, the Angel of Optimism came to him and spoke kindly, saying: "Brother, what does thou carry?" The man answered surlily, "My worries." The angel smiled pityingly upon him and said, "Let us look into thy burden and examine thy worries." And so they looked in. But lo! the sack was empty. "Why surely," cried the man, "there were two great worries, too heavy for man to bear. But-ah, yes, I had forgot-one was a worry of yesterday, and so it is gone." "And the other?" "That-why, that was a worry of tomorrow, and it-it has not yet come." Then the angel smiled with infinite pity, saying: "Hearken! He who bows himself down under the worries of yesterday and tomorrow wears himself out for naught. But he who carries only the worries of today has no need of a sack for his sorrows. If thou will cast this black thing aside, and give all thy strength and cheer and courage to the things of today, real misfortune never can burden thee." Wondering, the man did as the angel commanded. And as he took up his journey and went lightly, swiftly on, his heart and his hands were free to relieve many a brother wayfarer of his burden and to pluck sweet fruits and flowers along the wayside. And when he came at last to the setting of the sun it was with smiles and a song.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on pity

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Pity is reserved for those who have no fight left in them.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on boldness, cities, innocence, love, and pity

Ah, some love Paris, And some Purdue. But love is an archer with a low I.Q. A bold, bad bowman, and innocent of pity. So I'm in love with New York City.

unknown

Source: A Kind of Love Letter to New York, 1954

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on admiration, forgiveness, love, and pity

Could we look into the hearts concealed from us, we should often pity where we hate, love where we think we can never forgive, and admire where we curl the lip with scorn and indignation.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Vernor Smith on anxiety, army, belief, bitterness, chance, day, death, disaster, dreams, endurance, foolishness, freedom, friendship, glory, government, heart, hope, ignorance, laughter, life, losing, patience, peace, people, pity, powe

No man made great by death offers more hope to lowly pride than does Abraham Lincoln; for while living he was himself so simple as often to be dubbed a fool. Foolish he was, they said, in losing his youthful heart to a grave and living his life on married patience; foolish in pitting his homely ignorance against Douglas, brilliant, courtly, and urbane; foolish in setting himself to do the right in a world where the day goes mostly to the strong; foolish in dreaming of freedom for a long-suffering folk whom the North is as anxious to keep out as the South was to keep down; foolish in choosing the silent Grant to lead to victory the hesitant armies of the North; foolish, finally, in presuming that government for the people must be government of the people and by the people. Foolish many said; foolish many, many believed. This Lincoln, whom so many living friends and foes alike deemed foolish, hid his bitterness in laughter; fed his sympathy on solitude; and met recurring disaster with whimsicality to muffle the murmur of a bleeding heart. Out of the tragic sense of life he pitied where others blamed; bowed his own shoulders with the woes of the weak; endured humanely his little day of chance power; and won through death what life disdains to bestow upon such simple souls - lasting peace and everlasting glory.

Thomas Vernor Smith

Source: Illinois Senate, Feb 12,’35, Lincoln's 126th birthday —Smith, Lincoln, Living Legend, pp. 3-5

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Paine on birds, death, heart, imagination, pity, and reality

[Burke] is not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart, but by the showy resemblance of it striking his imagination. He pities the plumage, but forgets the dying bird.

Thomas Paine (1737 - 1809)

Source: The Rights of Man, pt. I, 1791

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Moss on heaven and pity

Pity the sorrows of a poor old man, Whose trembling limbs have borne him to your door, Whose days are dwindled to the shortest span; Oh give relief, and Heaven will bless your store.

Thomas Moss (1740 - 1808)

Source: The Beggar.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Hood on men and pity

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When Eve upon the first of Men The apple press'd with specious cant, Oh! what a thousand pities then That Adam was not Adamant!

Thomas Hood (1798 - 1845)

Source: A Reflection

Contributed by: Zaady

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