philosophy

A Quote by Aristotle on fear, laws, and philosophy

I have gained this from philosophy: that I do without being commanded what others do only from fear of the law.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Source: Diogenes Laeritius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers, book V

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on philosophy, science, and truth

Philosophy is the science which considers truth.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Antoinette Brown Blackwell on feeling, guidance, philosophy, and women

A woman finds the natural lay of the land almost unconsciously; and not feeling it incumbent on her to be guide and philosopher to any successor, she takes little pains to mark the route by which she is making her ascent.

Antoinette Brown Blackwell (1825 - 1921)

Source: The Sexes Throughout Nature, 1875.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anna Brownell Jameson on art, conversation, love, philosophy, poetry, scandal, and weather

Conversation may be compared to a lyre with seven chords--philosophy, art, poetry, love, scandal, and the weather.

Anna Brownell Jameson (1794 - 1860)

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A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on appearance, discovery, existence, mind, philosophy, purpose, time, and truth

TRUTH, n. An ingenious compound of desirability and appearance. Discovery of truth is the sole purpose of philosophy, which is the most ancient occupation of the human mind and has a fair prospect of existing . . . to the end of time.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

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A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on dreams, philosophy, and reality

REALITY, n. The dream of a mad philosopher. That which would remain in the cupel if one should assay a phantom. The nucleus of a vacuum.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

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A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on philosophy

PYRRHONISM, n. An ancient philosophy, named for its inventor. It consisted of an absolute disbelief in everything but Pyrrhonism. Its modern professors have added that.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on ignorance, knowledge, and philosophy

POSITIVISM, n. A philosophy that denies our knowledge of the Real and affirms our ignorance of the Apparent. Its longest exponent is Comte, its broadest Mill and its thickest Spencer.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on affection, disability, love, and philosophy

PLATONIC, adj. Pertaining to the philosophy of Socrates. Platonic Love is a fool's name for the affection between a disability and a frost.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on leadership and philosophy

PHILOSOPHY, n. A route of many roads leading from nowhere to nothing.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

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