philosophy

A Quote by Charles Dudley Warner on alienation, garden, hope, leadership, patience, philosophy, resignation, understanding, and value

The principal value of a garden is not understood. It is not to give the possessors vegetables and fruit (that can be better and cheaper done by the market-gardeners), but to teach him patience and philosophy, and the higher virtues - hope deferred, and expectations blighted, leading directly to resignation, and sometimes to alienation.

Charles Dudley Warner (1829 - 1900)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Catherine Marshall on appreciation, conflict, education, evil, existence, freedom, friendship, good, government, greed, happiness, hatred, idealism, ignorance, individuality, lies, life, lust, niceness, optimism, pain, people, philosophy, pove

Without realizing what was happening, most of us gradually came to take for granted the premises underlying the philosophy of optimism. We proceeded to live these propositions, though we would not have stated them as blandly as I set them forth here: Man is inherently good. Individual man can carve out his own salvation with the help of education and society through progressively better government. Reality and values worth searching for lie in the material world that science is steadily teaching us to analyze, catalogue, and measure. While we do not deny the existence of inner values, we relegate them to second place. The purpose of life is happiness, [which] we define in terms of enjoyable activity, friends, and the accumulation of material objects. The pain and evil of life - such as ignorance, poverty, selfishness, hatred, greed, lust for power - are caused by factors in the external world; therefore, the cure lies in the reforming of human institutions and the bettering of environmental conditions. As science and technology remove poverty and lift from us the burden of physical existence, we shall automatically become finer persons, seeing for ourselves the value of living the Golden Rule. In time, the rest of the world will appreciate the demonstration that the American way of life is best. They will then seek for themselves the good life of freedom and prosperity. This will be the greatest impetus toward an end of global conflict. The way to get along with people is to beware of religious dictums and dogma. The ideal is to be a nice person and to live by the Creed of Tolerance. Thus we offend few people. We live and let live. This is the American Way.

Catherine Marshall

Source: Beyond Ourselves

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Carl Jacobi on aim, honor, mathematics, mind, philosophy, questions, science, world, and worth

It is true that Fourier had the opinion that the principal aim of mathematics was public utility and explanation of natural phenomena; but a philosopher like him should have known that the sole end of science is the honor of the human mind, and that under this title a question about numbers is worth as much as a question about the system of the world.

Carl Jacobi

Source: N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC:Rome Press Inc., 1988.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on philosophy and ridicule

To ridicule philosophy is really to philosophize.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées. 1670.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William B.‘Bill' Watterson II on curiosity, friendship, imagination, interest, justice, leadership, life, logic, nature, personality, personality, philosophy, reality, trouble, wisdom, and world

Calvin is named after John Calvin (1509-1564), a leader of the Reformation. John Calvin was well-known for expressing his opinions in a most lucid, logical and convincing manner. Six-year old Calvin is similarly eloquent in the expression of his opinions and attitudes, though his opinions differ greatly. Although Calvin is a six-year old, his contemplations and observations of the world around him are often extremely insightful. Calvin's curiosity and imagination often get him into trouble. He's not really a brat, just an interesting mixture of immaturity and innate wisdom. Hobbes is named after Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), a philosopher who had a low opinion of human nature. Hobbes, Calvin's tiger friend, is a bit more upbeat but seems to possess an opinion of humans similar to his namesake. It seems that one of the only things Hobbes does which bother Calvin (beside frequent pouncings) is the enjoyment he derives from gloating about being a tiger. Bill Watterson on Hobbes' "split personality": "The so-called gimmick of my strip - the two versions of Hobbes - is sometimes misunderstood. I don't think of Hobbes as a doll that miraculously comes to life when Calvin's around. Neither do I think of Hobbes as the product of Calvin's imagination. The nature of Hobbes's reality doesn't interest me, and each story goes out of its way to avoid resolving the issue. Calvin sees Hobbes one way, and everyone else sees Hobbes another way. I show two versions of reality and each make complete sense to the participant who sees it. I think that's how life works."

Bill Watterson (1958 -)

Source: Calvin and Hobbes

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bill Lye on listening, philosophy, and physics

Don't LOOK at anything in a physics lab. Don't TASTE anything in a chemistry lab. Don't SMELL anything in a biology lab. Don't TOUCH anything in a medical lab. And, most importantly, don't LISTEN to anything in a philosophy department.

Bill Lye

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on acceptance, change, common sense, democracy, education, ignorance, insincerity, language, life, mathematics, meaning, needs, philosophy, physics, understanding, and words

The doctrine, as I understand it, consists in maintaining that the language of daily life, with words used in their ordinary meanings, suffices for philosophy, which has no need of technical terms or of changes in the significance of common terms. I find myself totally unable to accept this view. I object to it: 1.Because it is insincere; 2.Because it is capable of excusing ignorance of mathematics, physics and neurology in those who have had only a classical education; 3.Because it is advanced by some in a tone of unctuous rectitude, as if opposition to it were a sin against democracy; 4.Because it makes philosophy trivial; 5.Because it makes almost inevitable the perpetuation amongst philosophers of the muddle-headedness they have taken over from common sense.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Portraits from Memory, Russell

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on philosophy and science

Science is what you know, philosophy is what you don't know.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on belief, paradox, philosophy, simplicity, and worth

The point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: The Philosophy of Logical Atomism

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on achievement, beginning, belief, body, creation, failure, future, interest, justice, knowledge, literature, logic, mathematics, men, merit, order, past, philosophy, physics, problems, research, schools, scienc

The study of logic becomes the central study in philosophy: it gives the method of research in philosophy, just as mathematics gives the method in physics. . . . All this supposed knowledge in the traditional systems must be swept away, and a new beginning must be made. . . . To the large and still growing body of men engaged in the pursuit of science, . . . the new method, successful already in such time-honored problems as number, infinity, continuity, space and time, should make an appeal which the older methods have wholly failed to make. The one and only condition, I believe, which is necessary in order to secure for philosophy in the near future an achievement surpassing all that has hitherto been accomplished by philosophers, is the creation of a school of men with scientific training and philosophical interests, unhampered by the traditions of the past, and not misled by the literary methods of those who copy the ancients in all except their merits.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Our Knowledge of the External World, as a Field For Scientific Method in Philosophy

Contributed by: Zaady

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