philosophy

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on information, kindness, learning, meditation, philosophy, secrets, thought, truth, and water

For it is esteemed a kind of dishonour unto learning to descend to inquiry or meditation upon matters mechanical, except they be such as may be thought secrets, rarities, and special subtleties, which humour of vain supercilious arrogancy is justly derided in Plato. . . . But the truth is, they be not the highest instances that give the securest information; as may well be expressed in the tale . . . of the philosopher, that while he gazed upwards to the stars fell into the water; for if he had looked down he might have seen the stars in the water, but looking aloft he could not see the water in the stars. So it cometh often to pass, that mean and small things discover great, better than great can discover the small.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: The Advancement of Learning, J.M. Dent and Son, London, England, 1973, pp 71-72.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on doubt, exploring, philosophy, and study

Philosophy when superficially studied, excites doubt, when thoroughly explored, it dispels it.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on good, philosophy, and religion

All good moral philosophy is but a handmaid to religion.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Advancement of Learning

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on logic, mathematics, men, philosophy, poets, and rhetoric

Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Essays. Of Studies (1597-1625)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on atheism, men, mind, philosophy, and religion

A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Source: Essays. Atheism

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ezra Taft Benson on courage, fatherhood, government, nations, opposites, people, philosophy, simplicity, and support

That government is best which governs the least, so taught the courageous founders of this nation. This simple declaration is diametrically opposed to the all too common philosophy that the government should protect and support one from the cradle to the grave. The policy of the Founding Fathers has made our people and our nation strong. The opposite leads inevitably to moral decay.

Ezra Taft Benson (1899 - 1994)

Source: at BYU, February 28,1962

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ethan Allen on lies, mortality, philosophy, and spirit

The mortal remains of Ethan Allen, fighter, writer, statesman, and philosopher, lie in this cemetery beneath the marble statue. His spirit is in Vermont now.

Ethan Allen (1738 - 1789)

Source: (Greenmount Cemetery; Burlington, Vermont)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Epictetus on abstinence, lies, philosophy, and words

All philosophy lies in two words, "sustain" and "abstain."

Epictetus (c. 50 - 120)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Epictetus on decisions, evil, exercise, and philosophy

Shall I show you the sinews of a philosopher? "What sinews are those?" - A will undisappointed; evils avoided; powers daily exercised; careful resolutions; unerring decisions.

Epictetus (c. 50 - 120)

Source: Discourses

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emil Brunner on belief, buddhism, character, christ, christianity, communication, direction, divinity, faith, god, history, indifference, islam, jesus, life, personality, personality, philosophy, practice, prophets, questions, religion, soul,

For the Platonic or Aristotelian philosophy, it is of no importance whether Plato or Aristotle ever lived. For the mystical practice of an Indian, Persian, Chinese, or Neo-Platonic mystic it is a matter of indifference whether Rama, Buddha, Laotse, or Porphyrius are myths or not. The mystic has no personal relation to them. It is not here a question of somebody telling me the truth which of myself I cannot find, but of my finding an access to the depths of the world in the depths of my soul. And everywhere the tendency is to eliminate personality. Even where religion does not have this mystical character, it has no relation to an historical person, who communicates himself to me. That is the characteristic essence of the Christian faith alone. Even where a prophet plays the role of a mediator of divine truth, as for example in Islam, the religious act is not directed toward him but toward his teaching or message. But the Christian does not believe in the teachings of Jesus - which would not be Christian faith, but general religion - he believes in Christ Himself as being the Word of God.

Emil Brunner (1889 - 1966)

Source: The Word and the World

Contributed by: Zaady

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