philosophy

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, rights, democratism, principles, delusion, morals, politics, values, duties, obligations, civilization, and society

The moral and the political are twisted together in all this like a torqued Moebius-strip: we define our political duties toward others or our rights of expectation from them in terms of the highest moral values and obligations and principles conceivable to us. But these highest moral values etc. are themselves ideologically stunted things, a bonsai-ethos that has been deformed by the contraceptive culture of the democratist Many. Do human beings have a positive and universally recognizable right to be left alone as ingrown idiotes, as self-gratifying swinish consumers, as pathetic sacks of illusions and delusions? Are ultimate rights something that the least cultured and least reflective are fit to define for themselves, much less for everyone in general? Can any civilization afford to leave its most vital principles to be framed and legislated by the least philosophically aware? When a society organizes the entire thrust of its energies and institutions to mass-produce such obtuse types, and when malleable human nature makes this organized stupefaction all too easy and efficient, how can any mere exceptional individuals do anything about such a Malthusian dynamic?

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, rights, spirituality, morality, culture, community, self-development, modernity, and society

But for the Jews this moral-spiritual issue raises the same societal problem it does for the Greeks: how can a man have the "right" to make himself spiritually or rationally destitute or retarded when this corrupts the whole quality of the culture that we all together need and depend on? If anyone wants a cloistered and closed-minded life, an anti-aristic life, let him either go off and live among the wolves--or else join the community of like-minded idiots that (alas) compose and define the basic terms of modern society.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, civility, and self-discipline

I regret not getting brutally forthright with human beings a hell of a lot sooner than I did. Civility and obliquity are wasted on people who will not make the effort to be harsher or stricter on their own gooey egos than they are on other people.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, delusion, competency, and appropriateness

Should a reasonable person not demand that philosophy should not be foolishly purveyed before people incompetent to see the point of it, as pearls before swine? For Nietzsche is utterly correct: philosophy is only for the healthy and whole-minded, the sick it has always only made even sicker. By means of philosophy they dig themselves even deeper into their pathetic delusions. 

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, utilitarianism, banausoi, society, stupidity, deserving, exclusion, judgement, appropriateness, equality, democracy, merchants, and the public

To the Greeks not just slaves had to be excluded from the democratic franchise and public debate but also merchants, bankers, all money-grubbing banausoi, because any society stupid enough to entrust its ultimate values to be determined by the caste of utilitarians deserves fully what it gets. It would be like entrusting our sports to couch potatoes and paraplegics. Such a foolish society would get what we have in fact got, a civilization too fucking stupid to realize how hard cultural, political, spiritual and philosophical cripples labor to cripple everyone else to become just like them.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, wisdom, and discrimination

Offhandedly, when I consider the matter in abstracto, I might wonder how marvelous this world would be if indeed it were even possible to sell philosophy on the market. That would mean that some quorum or critical mass of intelligent minds existed who (a) understood what it really was, (b) comprehended how deformed and crippled and darkened life would be without it being developed to the utmost, and (c) recognized that there was nothing else whatsoever in all the finite world that one should not be willing to pay in order to secure one's basal principles of wisdom first, just because of the richer life that comes in their wake. Just the idea of having enough culturally literate minds to be capable of discriminating between philosophizing and sappy moralizing or vacuous feel-good rhetoric, enough to make the marketing of philosophy feasible: that would be historically and civilizationally prodigious.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, values, ideals, self-deception, priorities, time, and importance

People compose the schedules they do out of the priorities they have; and someone who says otherwise is deceiving himself about what he really values. The same thing applies to money that applies to time. I make a practice of watching what people do, never what they say. Whatever is important, to anyone sane, he will make a place for it; people live out their values. Values are different in this respect from "ideals," which are typically vain and effete and thus exist mostly for the sake of promoting self-delusions.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, values, prejudices, preconceptions, reason, compromise, and pandering

Values and verdicts never bother me half as much as people trying to weasel their way around them, or people compromising their reason to pander to their own prejudices and preconceptions, which they are so rarely competent to look in the face.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, students, thinking, belief, dogmatism, orthodoxy, reasoning, enlightenment, values, principles, and culture

How many students who make it into the liberal arts and into philosophy classes still only manage to comprehend the content of these courses dogmatically, as simplisms to "believe"? Instead of grasping principles and values and an aristic ethos of clarity, they still only hear what pleases and flatters them: they grasp in Socrates or Plato the "countercultural" overtones that enable them to shower abuse on the diseased culture of their parents or peers, but they don't grasp at all the overwhelming obligation for themselves not to lie in orthodoxy's bed of sloth. They substitute, as opinionizers and slaves will do, one orthodoxy for another, imagining that the processes of "enlightenment" will change only the matter they think about and not the form of their own activity in reasoning. 

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by unknown on philosophy and taoism

"What is, is not; what is not, is."

unknown

Source: The Hsinhsinming

Contributed by: okami

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