perception

A Quote by John Keats on beauty, certainty, clarity, perception, and truth

I never can feel certain of any truth, but from a clear perception of its beauty.

John Keats (1795 - 1821)

Source: Letter to George and Georgiana Keats (January 1819)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John C. Brobston on perception and style

If the public perception is that banning these ["assault"-style] firearms will do anything except annoy their owners, then there is something wrong with the public perception.

John C. Brobston

Source: 1992, via CompuServe

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jim Nollman on art, facts, happiness, life, paradise, perception, simplicity, and path

Like William Morris, Joe Hollis asks us to perceive paradise gardening as a juncture where artfulness directly serves life. In fact, we might go so far as to define this paradise as the place where art is indistinguishable from life, and where simplicity is codified as the best path for achieving happiness.

Jim Nollman

Source: Why We Garden, 1994, p. 57.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James R. Newman on behavior and perception

It is strange that we know so little about the properties of numbers. They are our handiwork, yet they baffle us; we can fathom only a few of their intricacies. Having defined their attributes and prescribed their behavior, we are hard pressed to perceive the implications of our formulas.

James R. Newman

Source: quoted by Gary William Flake in The Computational Beauty of Nature, 1998

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James Russell Lowell on memory and perception

He gives us the very quintessence of perception,-the clearly crystalized precipitation of all that is most precious in the ferment of impression after the impertinent and obtrusive particulars have evaporated from the memory.

James Lowell (1819 - 1891)

Source: Coleridge.

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A Quote by James Allen on circumstances, idealism, perception, and travel

Your circumstances may be uncongenial, but they shall not long remain so if you but perceive an Ideal and strive to reach it. You can not travel within and stand still without.

James Allen (1864 - 1912)

Source: As A Man Thinketh

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ahmad Ibn `Ata'Allah on god, logic, meaning, perception, reason, and senses

Your Saying "God is Most Great" does not mean that He is greater than something else, since there is nothing else alongside of Him, so that it could be said that He is greater than it. Rather, the meaning of Allahu Akbar is that He is much too great to be perceived by the senses or for the depths of His Majesty to be reached by reason and logic, and indeed, that He is much too great to be known by an other-than-Him for truly, no one knows God but God.

Ibn Ata'Allah

Source: The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation, 1996. p. 119

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ahmad Ibn `Ata'Allah on bliss, emptiness, god, heart, meaning, and perception

If a tablet is not wiped clean of it's figures, nothing can be written upon it. A single heart cannot serve as the place for two things, let alone for several things. If the heart is filled with the forms of sensory perceptions, it is rare that it would perceive the meaning of Allah, even if one were to say Allah a thousand times. When the heart is empty of all that is other-than-God, if one uttered Allah only once, one would find such bliss that the tongue could not describe.

Ibn Ata'Allah

Source: The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation, 1996. p. 92-93

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on departure, dreams, eternity, facts, god, imagination, perception, reason, understanding, and universe

Questioner: How do you know God? Abu Asa'id al-Kharraz: By the fact that He is the coincidentia oppositorum. Corbin's commentary: . . . the entire universe of worlds is at once He and not-He (huwa la huwa). The God manifested in forms is at once Himself and other than Himself, for since He is manifested, He is the limited which has no limit, the visible which cannot be seen. This manifestation is neither perceptible nor verifiable by the sensory faculties; discursive reason rejects it. It is perceptible only by the Active Imagination (Hadrat al-Khayal...) at times when it dominates man's sense perceptions, in dreams or better still in the waking state (in the state characteristic of the gnostic when he departs from the consciousness of sensuous things). In short, a mystic perception (dhawq) is required. To perceive all forms as epiphanic forms (mazahir), that is, to perceive through the figures which they manifest and which are the eternal hexeities, that they are other than the Creator and nevertheless that they are He, is precisely to effect the encounter, the coincidence, between God's descent toward the creature and the creature's ascent toward the Creator. The "place" of this encounter is not outside the Creator-Creature totality, but is the area within it which corresponds specifically to the Active Imagination, in the manner of a bridge joining the two banks of a river. The crossing itself is essentially a hermeneutics of symbols, a method of understanding which transmutes sensory data and rational concepts into symbols (mazahir) by making them effect this crossing.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 188-189

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn al-`Arabi on divinity, eternity, god, perception, universe, and world

Everything we call other than God, everything we call the universe, is related to the Divine Being as the shadow to the person. The world is God's shadow. . . . The shadow is at once God and something other than God. Everything we perceive is the Divine Being in the eternal hexeities of the possibles.

Ibn al-'Arabi (1165 - 1240)

Source: Corbin, Henry. Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn `Arabi, 1969. p. 191

Contributed by: Zaady

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