perception

A Quote by Lao Tzu on acceptance, body, perception, truth, understanding, and universe

Simply see that you are at the center of the universe, and accept all things and beings as parts of your infinite body. When you perceive that an act done to another is done to yourself, you have understood the great truth.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Hua Hu Ching, (42)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on awareness, evolution, and perception

Those who are highly evolved maintain an undiscriminating perception. Seeing everything, labeling nothing, they maintain their awareness of the Great Oneness. Thus they are supported by it.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Hua Hu Ching, (19)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on egotism, ideas, names, and perception

The ego is entranced by ... names and ideas... (However) names and concepts only block your perception of this Great Oneness. Therefore it is wise to ignore them. Those who live inside their egos are continually bewildered.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Hua Hu Ching, (32)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on acceptance, awareness, circumstances, direction, falsehood, goodwill, illusions, leadership, perception, spontaneity, truth, virtue, taoism, and path

{There are two paths leading to oneness with the Tao.} The first in the path of acceptance. Affirm everyone and everything. Freely extend you goodwill and virtue in every direction, regardless of circumstances. Embrace all things as part of the Harmonious Oneness, and then you will begin to perceive it. The second path is that of denial. Recognize that everything you see and think is a falsehood, an illusion, a veil over the truth. Peel all the veils away, and you will arrive at the Oneness. Though these paths are entirely different, they will deliver you to the same place: spontaneous awareness of the Great Oneness.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Hua Hu Ching, (48)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Julia Penelope on force, language, men, perception, present, and world

Language forces us to perceive the world as men present it to us.

Julia Penelope

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jules Henri Poincaré on life and perception

Talk with M. Hermite. He never evokes a concrete image, yet you soon perceive that the more abstract entities are to him like living creatures.

Jules Henri Poincare (1854 - 1912)

Source: G. Simmons Calculus Gems, New York: McGraw Hill Inc., 1992.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Updike on perception, possessions, and value

Possession diminishes perception of value, immediately.

John Updike (1932 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Randolph of Roanoke on faults, good, men, past, perception, and seasons

Reprove not, in their wrath, excited men; good counsel comes all out of season then; but when their fury is appeased and past, they will perceive their faults, and mend at last. When he is cool and calm, then utter it.

John Randolph (1773 - 1833)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on certainty, doubt, existence, experience, intuition, knowledge, needs, pain, perception, pleasure, proof, reason, thinking, and thought

Our knowledge of our own existence is intuitive. As for our own existence, we perceive it so plainly and so certainly, that it neither needs nor is capable of any proof. . . . I think, I reason, I feel pleasure and pain: can any of these be more evident to me than my own existence? . . . For if I know I feel pain, it is evident I have as certain perception of my own existence, as of the existence of the pain I feel: or if I know I doubt, I have as certain perception of the existence of the thing doubting, as of that thought which I call doubt. Experience then convinces us, that we have an intuitive knowledge of our own existence, and an internal infallible perception that we are. In every act of sensation, reasoning, or thinking, we are conscious to ourselves of our own being; and, in this matter, come not short of the highest degree of certainty.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Locke on beginning, certainty, doubt, eternity, existence, god, happiness, hunger, impossibility, intelligence, knowledge, needs, originality, pain, perception, power, time, and world

To show, therefore, that we are capable of knowing, i.e. being certain that there is a God, and how we may come by this certainty, I think we need go no further than ourselves, and that undoubted knowledge we have of our own existence. . . . For man knows that he himself exists. . . . If any one pretends to be so sceptical as to deny his own existence, (for really to doubt of it is manifestly impossible,) let him for me enjoy his beloved happiness of being nothing, until hunger or some other pain convince him of the contrary. . . . He knows also that nothing cannot produce a being; therefore something must have existed from eternity. . . . Next, it is evident, that what had its being and beginning from another, must also have all that which is in and belongs to its being from another too. All the powers it has must be owing to and received from the same source. This eternal source, then, of all being must also be the source and original of all power; and so this eternal Being must be also the most powerful. . . . And most knowing. Again, a man finds in himself perception and knowledge. We have then got one step further; and we are certain now that there is not only some being, but some knowing, intelligent being in the world. There was a time, then, when there was no knowing being, and when knowledge began to be; or else there has been also a knowing being from eternity. . . . And therefore God.

John Locke (1632 - 1704)

Source: Second Treatise of Government, 1690

Contributed by: Zaady

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